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Spatial Patterns of Development: A Meso Approach

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  • Michalopoulos, Stelios
  • Papaioannou, Elias

Abstract

Over the last two decades, the literature on comparative development has moved from country-level to within-country analyses. The questions asked have expanded, as economists have used satellite images of light density at night and other big spatial data to proxy for development at the desired level. The focus has also shifted from uncovering correlations to identifying causal relations, using elaborate econometric techniques including spatial regression discontinuity designs. In this survey we show how the combination of geographic information systems with insights from disciplines ranging from the earth sciences to linguistics and history has transformed the research landscape on the roots of the spatial patterns of development. We discuss the limitations of the luminosity data and associated econometric techniques and conclude by offering some thoughts on future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Michalopoulos, Stelios & Papaioannou, Elias, 2018. "Spatial Patterns of Development: A Meso Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 12574, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12574
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    3. Christophe Muller & Pierre Pecher, 2018. "Transborder Ethnic Kin and Local Prosperity: Evidence form Night-Time Light Intensity in Africa," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2018006, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Colella, Fabrizio & Lalive, Rafael & Sakalli, Seyhun Orcan & Thoenig, Mathias, 2019. "Inference with Arbitrary Clustering," IZA Discussion Papers 12584, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    6. Philip Roessler & Yannick I. Pengl & Robert Marty & Kyle Sorlie Titlow & Nicolas van de Walle, 2020. "The Cash Crop Revolution, Colonialism and Legacies of Spatial Inequality: Evidence from Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2020-12, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • N9 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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