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Dots to Boxes: Do the Size and Shape of Spatial Units Jeopardize Economic Geography Estimations?

  • Briant, Anthony
  • Combes, Pierre-Philippe
  • Lafourcade, Miren

This paper evaluates, in the context of economic geography estimates, the magnitude of the distortions arising from the choice of zoning system, which is also known as the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP). We consider three standard economic geography exercises (the analysis of spatial concentration, agglomeration economies, and trade determinants), using various French zoning systems differentiated according to the size and shape of spatial units, which are the two main determinants of the MAUP. While size matters a little, shape does so much less. Both dimensions seem to be of secondary importance compared to specification issues.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 6928.

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Date of creation: Aug 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6928
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