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The integration of economic history into economics

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  • Robert A. Margo

    (Boston University)

Abstract

In the USA today the academic field of economic history is much closer to economics than it is to history in terms of professional behavior, a stylized fact that I call the “integration of economic history into economics.” I document this using two types of evidence—use of econometric language in articles appearing in academic journals of economic history and economics; and publication histories of successive cohorts of Ph.D.s in the first decade since receiving the doctorate. Over time, economic history became more like economics in its use of econometrics and in the likelihood of scholars publishing in economics, as opposed to, say, economic history journals. But the pace of change was slower in economic history than in labor economics, another subfield of economics that underwent profound intellectual change in the 1950s and 1960s, and there was also a structural break evident for post-2000 Ph.D. cohorts. To account for these features of the data, I sketch a simple, overlapping generations model of the academic labor market in which junior scholars have to convince senior scholars of the merits of their work in order to gain tenure. I argue that the early cliometricians—most notably, Robert Fogel and Douglass North—conceived of a scholarly identity for economic history that kept the field distinct from economics proper in various ways, until after 2000 when their influence had waned.

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  • Robert A. Margo, 2018. "The integration of economic history into economics," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(3), pages 377-406, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:cliomt:v:12:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11698-018-0170-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s11698-018-0170-8
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    18. Javier Mejia, 2019. "The Economics of the Manila Galleon," Working Papers 20190023, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Jan 2019.
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    22. Sascha O. Becker, 2022. "Forced displacement in history: Some recent research," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 62(1), pages 2-25, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics; Economic history; Integration; Labor economics; Econometrics; Overlapping generations; Scholarly identity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods

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