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The Economic History of the American Economic Review : A Century's Explosion of Economics Research


  • Robert A. Margo


Written in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the American Economic Review , this paper recounts the history of the journal. The recounting has an analytic core that sees the American Economic Association as an organization supplying goods and services to its members, one of which is the Review . Early in its history the Review was a multipurpose publication with highly disparate content. Over time the economics profession expanded and more economics research was produced, primarily in the form of journal articles. Editors accommodated this shift by allocating more resources to the refereeing and editing process and more space to research papers. (JEL A14, B19, B29)

Suggested Citation

  • Robert A. Margo, 2011. "The Economic History of the American Economic Review : A Century's Explosion of Economics Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 9-35, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:1:p:9-35

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ofer H. Azar, 2005. "The Review Process in Economics: Is It Too Fast?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(2), pages 482-491, October.
    2. John J. Siegfried, 2012. "Report of the Treasurer," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 626-630, May.
    3. Aditi Mehta & Marc Rysman & Tim Simcoe, 2006. "Identifying the Age Profile of Patent Citations," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2006-022, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    4. Sauer, Raymond D, 1988. "Estimates of the Returns to Quality and Coauthorship in Economic Academia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 855-866, August.
    5. Engers, Maxim & Gans, Joshua S, 1998. "Why Referees Are Not Paid (Enough)," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1341-1349, December.
    6. David N. Laband & Robert D. Tollison, 2003. "Dry Holes in Economic Research," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 161-173, May.
    7. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "The Relative Impacts of Economics Journals: 1970-1990," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 640-666, June.
    8. Coats, A W, 1969. "The American Economic Association's Publications: An Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 57-68, March.
    9. Bogart, Dan, 2009. "Nationalizations and the Development of Transport Systems: Cross-Country Evidence from Railroad Networks, 1860–1912," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(01), pages 202-237, March.
    10. Christ, Carl F, 1983. "The Founding of the Econometric Society and Econometrica," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(1), pages 3-6, January.
    11. Joshua S. Gans & George B. Shepherd, 1994. "How Are the Mighty Fallen: Rejected Classic Articles by Leading Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 165-179, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert A. Margo, 2017. "The Integration of Economic History into Economics," NBER Working Papers 23538, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:545-79 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B19 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Other
    • B29 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Other


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