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The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors

Author

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  • Joao Ricardo Faria

Abstract

This paper studies a differential game between authors and editors. Authors maximize the number of publications seeking to increase the impact of their work in the literature. Editors maximize the quality of papers they publish in order to increase the reputation of their journals. The game is suitable to analyze two different scenarios. When journals have different reputations, the editors of the leading journals play as leaders while authors are the followers. When journals have the same reputation, both agents play as followers. A numerical example shows that the outcome of the first case is Pareto-superior to the second whenever editor's put more emphasis on quality vis-a-vis reputation.

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Ricardo Faria, 2000. "The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors," Working Paper Series 105, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:wpaper:105
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    File URL: http://www.finance.uts.edu.au/research/wpapers/wp105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Formby, John P & Gunther, William D & Sakano, Ryoichi, 1993. "Entry Level Salaries of Academic Economists: Does Gender or Age Matter?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 128-138, January.
    2. Michael S. McPherson & Morton Owen Schapiro, 1999. "Tenure Issues in Higher Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 85-98, Winter.
    3. C. Elton Hinshaw & John J. Siegfried, 1995. "Who Gets on the AEA Program?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 153-163, Winter.
    4. João Ricardo Faria, 2003. "What type of economist are you: -strategist or -strategist?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(2), pages 144-154, May.
    5. Robison, Lindon J. & Colyer, Dale, 1994. "Reflections On Relevance Of Professional Journals," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-16, July.
    6. Jansen, Dennis W., 1991. "Ranking federal reserve system research departments by publications in professional journals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 733-742.
    7. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
    8. Siegfried, John J., 1994. "Trends in institutional affiliation of authors who publish in the three leading general interest economics journals," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 375-386.
    9. Faria, Joao Ricardo, 2002. "Scientific, business and political networks in academia," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 187-198, June.
    10. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "Favoritism versus Search for Good Papers: Empirical Evidence Regarding the Behavior of Journal Editors," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(1), pages 194-203, February.
    11. Yohe, Gary W, 1980. "Current Publication Lags in Economics Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 1050-1055, September.
    12. Zivney, Terry L & Bertin, William J, 1992. " Publish or Perish: What the Competition Is Really Doing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(1), pages 295-329, March.
    13. Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 1986. "What is a Citation Worth?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 200-215.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    journal publications; sociology of economics citation analyses; differential games;

    JEL classification:

    • A19 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Other
    • C79 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Other
    • L19 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Other

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