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The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors


  • Joao Ricardo Faria


This paper studies a differential game between authors and editors. Authors maximize the number of publications seeking to increase the impact of their work in the literature. Editors maximize the quality of papers they publish in order to increase the reputation of their journals. The game is suitable to analyze two different scenarios. When journals have different reputations, the editors of the leading journals play as leaders while authors are the followers. When journals have the same reputation, both agents play as followers. A numerical example shows that the outcome of the first case is Pareto-superior to the second whenever editor's put more emphasis on quality vis-a-vis reputation.

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Ricardo Faria, 2000. "The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors," Working Paper Series 105, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:wpaper:105

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael S. McPherson & Morton Owen Schapiro, 1999. "Tenure Issues in Higher Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 85-98, Winter.
    2. João Ricardo Faria, 2003. "What type of economist are you: -strategist or -strategist?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(2), pages 144-154, May.
    3. Jansen, Dennis W., 1991. "Ranking federal reserve system research departments by publications in professional journals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 733-742.
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    5. Formby, John P & Gunther, William D & Sakano, Ryoichi, 1993. "Entry Level Salaries of Academic Economists: Does Gender or Age Matter?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 128-138, January.
    6. C. Elton Hinshaw & John J. Siegfried, 1995. "Who Gets on the AEA Program?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 153-163, Winter.
    7. Robison, Lindon J. & Colyer, Dale, 1994. "Reflections On Relevance Of Professional Journals," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
    8. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
    9. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "Favoritism versus Search for Good Papers: Empirical Evidence Regarding the Behavior of Journal Editors," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(1), pages 194-203, February.
    10. Yohe, Gary W, 1980. "Current Publication Lags in Economics Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 1050-1055, September.
    11. Zivney, Terry L & Bertin, William J, 1992. " Publish or Perish: What the Competition Is Really Doing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(1), pages 295-329, March.
    12. Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 1986. "What is a Citation Worth?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 200-215.
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    Cited by:

    1. Damien Besancenot & Kim Huynh & Joao Faria, 2012. "Search and research: the influence of editorial boards on journals’ quality," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 73(4), pages 687-702, October.
    2. Besancenot, Damien & Vranceanu, Radu, 2008. "Can incentives for research harm research? A business schools' tale," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1248-1265, June.
    3. repec:kap:sbusec:v:48:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-016-9795-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mirucki, Jean & Nicot, Bernadette & Poshyvak, Maria, 2007. "What Can EconLit Reveal Us About Ukraine's Scholarly Production?," MPRA Paper 27717, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Faria, João Ricardo & Mixon, Franklin G. & Salter, Sean P., 2012. "An economic model of workplace mobbing in academe," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 720-726.
    6. Rajeev K. Goel, 2006. "The Game Academics Play: Comment," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 19-23, January.
    7. Mirucki, Jean & Poshyvak, Maria, 2006. ""Ukraine" in scholarly publications: An analysis based on econLit," MPRA Paper 29090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Thushari Silva & Jian Ma & Chen Yang & Haidan Liang, 2015. "A profile-boosted research analytics framework to recommend journals for manuscripts," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 66(1), pages 180-200, January.
    9. Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, July.
    10. Joao Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andréas Novak, 2009. "Paradigm depletion, knowledge production and research effort," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00447302, HAL.
    11. Guillaume Cabanac, 2012. "Shaping the landscape of research in information systems from the perspective of editorial boards: A scientometric study of 77 leading journals," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 63(5), pages 977-996, May.
    12. Besancenot Damien & Faria João R. & Huynh Kim V., 2014. "Congestion of Academic Journals Under Papers’ Imperfect Selection," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1145-1167, July.
    13. Heintzelman Martin & Nocetti Diego, 2009. "Where Should we Submit our Manuscript? An Analysis of Journal Submission Strategies," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-28, September.
    14. Katja Rost & Bruno S. Frey, 2011. "Quantitative and Qualitative Rankings of Scholars," Schmalenbach Business Review (sbr), LMU Munich School of Management, vol. 63(1), pages 63-91, January.
    15. Berg, Nathan & Faria, Joao, 2008. "Negatively correlated author seniority and the number of acknowledged people: Name-recognition as a signal of scientific merit?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1234-1247, June.
    16. Mirucki, Jean, 2007. "Searching for a Scholarly Visibility: The Case of Ukraine," MPRA Paper 27292, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2007.
    17. João Faria & Rajeev Goel, 2010. "Returns to networking in academia," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 103-117, July.
    18. João Ricardo Faria & Rajeev K. Goel, 2016. "Academic Publication Uncertainty and Publishing Behavior: A Game-Theoretic Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 6176, CESifo Group Munich.
    19. João Ricardo Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andreas J. Novak, 2011. "Paradigm Depletion, Knowledge Production And Research Effort: Considering Thomas Kuhn'S Ideas," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 587-604, November.
    20. Rex J. Pjesky & Daniel Sutter, 2011. "Does the Lack of a Profit Motive Affect Hiring in Academe? Evidence from the Market for Lawyers," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 1053-1084, October.
    21. Rajeev K. Goel & João Ricardo Faria, 2007. "Proliferation Of Academic Journals: Effects On Research Quantity And Quality," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 536-549, November.
    22. Alberto Baccini & Lucio Barabesi, 2008. "Interlocking Editorship. A Network Analysis of the Links Between Economic Journals," Department of Economics University of Siena 532, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

    More about this item


    journal publications; sociology of economics citation analyses; differential games;

    JEL classification:

    • A19 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Other
    • C79 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Other
    • L19 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Other


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