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Identifying the Age Profile of Patent Citations

Author

Listed:
  • Aditi Mehta

    () (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Marc Rysman

    () (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Tim Simcoe

    () (J.L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto)

Abstract

Previous work studying the age distribution of citations for patents relies on functional form assumptions to address the co-linearity between the birth year, citation year, and age. This paper proposes a non-parametric identification strategy that uses the lag between application and grant as a source of exogenous variation. We show empirically that the “citation clock” starts only when a patent issues, and we examine the potential bias if our assumption is incorrect. We use our approach to re-examine some prior results on the citation age profile of patents from different technological fields. We discuss potential extensions into other research areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Aditi Mehta & Marc Rysman & Tim Simcoe, 2007. "Identifying the Age Profile of Patent Citations," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2007-021, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2007-021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert A. Margo, 2011. "The Economic History of the American Economic Review : A Century's Explosion of Economics Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 9-35, February.
    2. Ufuk Akcigit & William R. Kerr, 2010. "Growth Through Heterogeneous Innovations," NBER Working Papers 16443, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Travaglini, Guido, 2008. "Dynamic GMM Estimation With Structural Breaks. An Application to Global Warming and its Causes," MPRA Paper 7108, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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