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Forced Out of the Closet: The Impact of the American Inventors Protection Act on the Timing of Patent Disclosure

  • Daniel K.N. Johnson
  • David Popp

Beginning in November 2000, patent applications filed in the United States are disclosed after 18 months, rather than when the patent is granted. Using U.S. patent data from 1976-1996, we find that major inventions are most likely to be affected, as they take longer to go through the application process. We provide evidence that this change will result in faster knowledge diffusion, and conclude with a simulation of the law's potential effect on patent grants.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8374.

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Date of creation: Jul 2001
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Publication status: published as Johnson, Daniel K. N. and David Popp. "Forced Out Of The Closet: The Impact Of The American Inventors Protection Act On The Timing Of Patent Disclosure," Rand Journal of Economics, 2003, v34(1,Spring), 96-112.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8374
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  1. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
  2. Bloch, Francis & Markowitz, Paul, 1996. "Optimal disclosure delay in multistage R&D competition," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 159-179.
  3. Zvi Griliches, 1990. "Patent Statistics as Economic Indicators: A Survey," NBER Working Papers 3301, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. repec:fth:harver:1473 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Jaffe, Adam B & Fogarty, Michael S & Banks, Bruce A, 1998. "Evidence from Patents and Patent Citations on the Impact of NASA and Other Federal Labs on Commercial Innovation," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 183-205, June.
  6. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 1996. "Flows of Knowledge from Universities and Federal Labs: Modeling the Flowof Patent Citations Over Time and Across Institutional and Geographic Boundari," NBER Working Papers 5712, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Janusz A. Ordover, 1991. "A Patent System for Both Diffusion and Exclusion," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 43-60, Winter.
  8. Eaton, Jonathan & Kortum, Samuel, 1999. "International Technology Diffusion: Theory and Measurement," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 537-70, August.
  9. Jean O. Lanjouw & Mark Schankerman, 1999. "The Quality of Ideas: Measuring Innovation with Multiple Indicators," NBER Working Papers 7345, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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