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Endogenous Asymmetric Shocks in the Eurozone. The Role of Animal Spirits

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  • De Grauwe, Paul
  • Ji, Yuemei

Abstract

Business cycles among Eurozone countries are highly correlated. We develop a two-country behavioral macroeconomic model in a monetary union setting where the two countries are linked with each other by international trade. The net export of country 1 depends on the output gap of country 2 and on real exchange rate movements. The synchronization of the business cycle is produced endogenously. The main channel of synchronization occurs through a propagation of "animal spirits"�, i.e. waves of optimism and pessimism that become correlated internationally. We find that this propagation occurs with relatively low levels of trade integration. We analyze the role of the common central bank in this propagation mechanism. We explore the transmission of demand and supply shocks and we study how the central bank affects this transmission. We verify the main predictions of the model empirically.

Suggested Citation

  • De Grauwe, Paul & Ji, Yuemei, 2017. "Endogenous Asymmetric Shocks in the Eurozone. The Role of Animal Spirits," CEPR Discussion Papers 11887, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11887
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    animal spirits; behavioral macroeconomics; Business Cycles; monetary union;

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