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Dual Labour Markets and (Lack of) On-The-Job Training: PIAAC Evidence from Spain and Other EU Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Cabrales, Antonio
  • Dolado, Juan J.
  • Mora, Ricardo

Abstract

Using the Spanish micro data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), we first document how the excessive gap in employment protection between indefinite and temporary workers leads to large differentials in on-the-job training (OTJ) against the latter. Next, we find that that the lower specific training received by temporary workers is correlated with lower literacy and numeracy scores achieved in the PIAAC study. Finally, we provide further PIAAC cross-country evidence showing that OJT gaps are quite lower in those European labour markets where dualism is less entrenched than in those where it is more extended.

Suggested Citation

  • Cabrales, Antonio & Dolado, Juan J. & Mora, Ricardo, 2014. "Dual Labour Markets and (Lack of) On-The-Job Training: PIAAC Evidence from Spain and Other EU Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 10246, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10246
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrea Bassanini & Luca Nunziata & Danielle Venn, 2009. "Job protection legislation and productivity growth in OECD countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 24, pages 349-402, April.
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    10. Samuel Bentolila & Juan Jose Dolado & Juan F. Jimeno, 2008. "Two-tier Employment Protection Reforms: The Spanish Experience," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 6(4), pages 49-56, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. De La Rica, Sara & Gortazar, Lucas, 2017. "Digitalization at work, Job Tasks and Wages: Cross-Country evidence from PIAAC1," GLO Discussion Paper Series 22, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Siassi, Nawid & Dolado, Juan J. & Lalé, Etienne, 2015. "Moving Towards a Single Labor Contract: Transition vs. Steady State," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112858, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Maurizio, Roxana., 2016. "Non-standard forms of employment in Latin America : prevalence, characteristics and impacts on wages," ILO Working Papers 994906973402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Carlos Henrique Corseuil & Miguel Foguel & Gustavo Gonzaga, 2016. "Apprenticeship as a stepping stone to beter jobs: Evidence from brazilian matched employer-employee data," Textos para discussão 651, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    5. repec:spr:series:v:8:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13209-017-0165-x is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Francesca Sgobbi, 2016. "Train the worst or train the best? The determinants of employer-sponsored training in five European countries," Working Papers 29, Birkbeck Centre for Innovation Management Research, revised Jan 2016.
    7. J. Ignacio García Pérez, 2015. "Should severance pay be consistent for all workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 174-174, August.
    8. G. Guidetti & G. Pedrini, 2015. "Systemic flexibility and human capital development: the relationship between non-standard employment and workplace training," Working Papers wp1019, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    9. Dolado, Juan J. & Lalé, Etienne & Siassi, Nawid, 2016. "From Dual to Unified Employment Protection: Transition and Steady State," IZA Discussion Papers 9953, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Yosuke Jin & Aida Caldera Sánchez & Pilar Garcia Perea, 2017. "Reforms for more and better quality jobs in Spain," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1386, OECD Publishing.
    11. de la Rica, Sara & Gortazar, Lucas, 2016. "Differences in Job De-Routinization in OECD Countries: Evidence from PIAAC," IZA Discussion Papers 9736, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cognitive skills; dual labour market; on-the-job training; severance pay;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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