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Skill gaps in the EU: role for education and training policies

  • Bert Minne

    ()

  • Marc van der Steeg

    ()

  • Dinand Webbink

    ()

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    Skill gaps are widely seen as a problem that lowers aggregate productivity growth. A question for the European Commission is whether and how governments should take action with education and training policies to reduce skill gaps and make Europe the best performing region in the world. European citizens can best decide for themselves on the type of education. Distribution of information on occupation prospects is effective to influence their choice of education. Moreover, it is important that the education system is sufficiently flexible to absorb unexpected shocks in skill needs of employees. Policies stimulating education targeted at government-assigned sectors are risky policies. Intensification of general education at the cost of specific education, and intensification of training of employees find little support.

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    File URL: http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/skill-gaps-eu-role-education-and-training-policies.pdf
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    Paper provided by CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in its series CPB Document with number 162.

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    Date of creation: Apr 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:cpb:docmnt:162
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