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Training Intensity and First Labor Market Outcomes of Apprenticeship Graduates

  • Rob Euwals

    ()

    (CBP Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Rainer Winkelmann

    ()

    (Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich)

The apprenticeship system is the most important source of formal post-secondary training in Germany. Using German register data - the IAB Employment Sample - we find that apprentices staying with their training firm after graduation have longer first-job durations but not higher wages than apprentices leaving the training firm. Retention rates, first job durations, and post-apprenticeship wages are all increasing functions of training intensity. Some implications for the ongoing debate as to why firms are willing to invest in general training are discussed.

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File URL: http://www.soi.uzh.ch/research/wp/2003/wp0308.pdf
File Function: First version, 2003
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Paper provided by Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich in its series SOI - Working Papers with number 0308.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in International Journal of Manpower 25, 2004, pages 447-462
Handle: RePEc:soz:wpaper:0308
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  1. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," NBER Working Papers 6357, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 6740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Thomas J. Kane & Dietmar Harhoff, 1997. "Is the German apprenticeship system a panacea for the U.S. labor market?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-196.
  4. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1996. "Why do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 1460, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. David G. Blanchflower & Richard B. Freeman, 2000. "Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number blan00-1, August.
  6. A. Werwatz, 1996. "How firm-specific is German apprenticeship training?," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 1996,12, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
  7. Damon Clark, 2001. "Why do German Firms Subsidize Apprenticeship Training?: Tests of the Asymmetric Information And Mobility Costs Explanation," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 102-106.
  8. Lancaster, Tony, 1979. "Econometric Methods for the Duration of Unemployment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 939-56, July.
  9. Wolfgang Franz & Joachim Inkmann & Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Zimmermann, 1997. "Young and Out in Germany: On the Youths' Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany," NBER Working Papers 6212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Wolfgang Franz & Volker Zimmermann, 1999. "Job Mobility after Apprenticeship Training in West Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 219(1+2), pages 143-164, July.
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