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How frequently firms export? Evidence from France

  • Gábor Békés
  • Lionel Fontagné
  • Balázs Muraközy
  • Vincent Vicard

This paper proposes studying export frequency as an additional margin of international trade. While extensive margins of products and destination define the scope of firm’s export, export shipment frequency is determined by sale method choice and cost structure of the trade technology. We define export shipment frequency as the per annum number of shipments of a given product, by a firm to a given destination. In order to more deeply understand the trade cost structure and sale methods, we estimate gravity models on export frequency and other margins of trade using monthly firm-product-destination level export data from France. We show that in key predictions of the model are validated. During the recent trade collapse, we also find a great deal of stability in shipment frequency with a modest adjustment to declining GDP.

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Paper provided by CEPII research center in its series Working Papers with number 2012-06.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2012-06
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  1. Joern Kleinert & Julia Spies, 2011. "Endogenous Transport Costs in International Trade," IAW Discussion Papers 74, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
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  18. repec:oup:qjecon:v:95:y:1980:i:1:p:25-43 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Russell W. Cooper & John C. Haltiwanger, 2006. "On the Nature of Capital Adjustment Costs," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 611-633.
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