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Report Cards: The Impact of Providing School and Child Test Scores on Educational Markets

Listed author(s):
  • Tahir Andrabi
  • Jishnu Das
  • Asim Khwaja

    (Center for International Development at Harvard University)

We study the impact of providing school and child test scores on subsequent test scores, prices, and enrollment in markets with multiple public and private providers. A randomly selected half of our sample villages (markets) received report cards. This increased test scores by 0.11 standard deviations, decreased private school fees by 17 percent and increased primary enrollment by 4.5 percent. Heterogeneity in the treatment impact by initial school quality is consistent with canonical models of asymmetric information. Information provision facilitates better comparisons across providers, improves market efficiency and raises child welfare through higher test scores, higher enrollment and lower fees.

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File URL: https://www.hks.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/centers/cid/files/publications/faculty-working-papers/ReportCards_287.pdf
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Paper provided by Center for International Development at Harvard University in its series CID Working Papers with number 287.

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Date of creation: Jun 2014
Handle: RePEc:cid:wpfacu:287
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