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Covid-19 school shutdowns: What will they do to our children's education?

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  • Andrew Eyles
  • Steve Gibbons
  • Piero Montebruno

Abstract

Evidence from unexpected temporary school closures and reduced instruction time suggests school closures will reduce educational achievement, both in the short and long term. Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are likely to be affected more than others by school closures, with fewer family resources and less access to online learning resources to offset lost instruction time. In England, the total cost of the resources lost in each week of state school closure is more than £1 billion. Educational deficits from time lost to school shutdowns can be made up with additional hours of teaching when schools reopen, though schools might need to put back more hours than were lost and it may not be feasible to do this within the traditional school year. Compensating lost instruction time through additional resources, without additional hours, is likely to be even more expensive.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Eyles & Steve Gibbons & Piero Montebruno, 2020. "Covid-19 school shutdowns: What will they do to our children's education?," CEP Covid-19 Briefings cepcovid-19-001, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepcvd:cepcovid-19-001
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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cepcovid-19-001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Schools

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    Cited by:

    1. Lee Elliot Major & Stephen Machin, 2020. "Covid-19 and social mobility," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 583, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Mathias Huebener & Sevrin Waights & C. Katharina Spiess & Nico A. Siegel & Gert G. Wagner, 2021. "Parental well-being in times of Covid-19 in Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 91-122, March.
    3. Darmody, Merike & Smyth, Emer & Russell, Helen, 2020. "The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for policy in relation to children and young people: a research review," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number SUSTAT94.
    4. Montebruno Bondi, Piero, 2020. "Disrupted schooling: impacts on achievement from the Chilean school occupations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108459, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Fernando Ferri & Patrizia Grifoni & Tiziana Guzzo, 2020. "Online Learning and Emergency Remote Teaching: Opportunities and Challenges in Emergency Situations," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-18, November.
    6. Clark, Andrew E. & Nong, Huifu & Zhu, Hongjia & Zhu, Rong, 2021. "Compensating for academic loss: Online learning and student performance during the COVID-19 pandemic," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    7. Roman, Monica & Plopeanu, Aurelian-Petruș, 2021. "The effectiveness of the emergency eLearning during COVID-19 pandemic. The case of higher education in economics in Romania," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).

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    Keywords

    schools; school closures; covid-19; education; disadvantaged children;
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