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Market Forces, Plant Technology, and the Food Safety Technology Use

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Ollinger
  • Danna Moore

Abstract

Economists (Ollinger and Mueller, 2003; Golan et al., 2004) have considered some of the economic forces, such as demands from major customers, that encourage plants to maintain food safety process control. Other economists, such as Roberts (2005), have identified food safety technologies that enable better control harmful pathogens. However, economists have not put the two together. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of economic forces, including firm effects and plant technology, customer demands, and regulation, on food safety technology use. Preliminary results suggest that customer demand has the greatest impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Ollinger & Danna Moore, 2008. "Market Forces, Plant Technology, and the Food Safety Technology Use," Working Papers 08-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:08-14
    as

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    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2008/CES-WP-08-14.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
    2. Ollinger, Michael & Mueller, Valerie, 2003. "Managing For Safer Food: The Economics Of Sanitation And Process Controls In Meat And Poultry Plants," Agricultural Economics Reports 33975, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Thomas Marsh & Ted Schroeder & James Mintert, 2004. "Impacts of meat product recalls on consumer demand in the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 897-909.
    4. Winnie Mitullah, 2000. "Food Safety Requirements and Food Exports from Developing Countries: The Case of Fish Exports from Kenya to the European Union," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1159-1169.
    5. Segerson, Kathleen, 1998. "Mandatory vs. Voluntary Approaches to Food Safety," Research Reports 25188, University of Connecticut, Food Marketing Policy Center.
    6. Michael R. Thomsen & Andrew M. McKenzie, 2001. "Market Incentives for Safe Foods: An Examination of Shareholder Losses from Meat and Poultry Recalls," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 526-538.
    7. Ollinger, Michael & Moore, Danna L. & Chandran, Ram, 2004. "Meat And Poultry Plants' Food Safety Investments: Survey Findings," Technical Bulletins 33559, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-641, August.
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