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The Food Safety Performance of Ground Beef Suppliers to the National School Lunch Program

Author

Listed:
  • Ollinger, Michael
  • Guthrie, Joanne
  • Bovay, John

Abstract

This report examines the food safety performance of suppliers of ground beef to the USDA National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Model results show that establishments that bid on contracts to supply NSLP displayed better food safety performance—in terms of fewer numbers of meat samples testing positive for Salmonella spp —than other establishments supplying ground beef to the commercial market. Results also show that the difference in food safety performance between the types of establishments may have narrowed after 2009. The report provides evidence that some establishments use information about their past food safety performance to decide whether to bid on contracts to supply NSLP.

Suggested Citation

  • Ollinger, Michael & Guthrie, Joanne & Bovay, John, 2014. "The Food Safety Performance of Ground Beef Suppliers to the National School Lunch Program," Economic Research Report 262211, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:262211
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.262211
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Michael Ollinger & Danna L. Moore, 2008. "The Economic Forces Driving Food Safety Quality in Meat and Poultry," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 30(2), pages 289-310.
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    7. Michael R. Thomsen & Rimma Shiptsova & Sandra J. Hamm, 2006. "Sales Responses to Recalls for Listeria monocytogenes: Evidence from Branded Ready-to-Eat Meats," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(4), pages 482-493.
    8. Michael Rothschild & Joseph Stiglitz, 1976. "Equilibrium in Competitive Insurance Markets: An Essay on the Economics of Imperfect Information," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(4), pages 629-649.
    9. Michael R. Thomsen & Andrew M. McKenzie, 2001. "Market Incentives for Safe Foods: An Examination of Shareholder Losses from Meat and Poultry Recalls," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 526-538.
    10. Starbird, S. Andrew & Amanor-Boadu, Vincent, 2006. "Do Inspection and Traceability Provide Incentives for Food Safety?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 1-13, April.
    11. Victoria Salin & Neal H. Hooker, 2001. "Stock Market Reaction to Food Recalls," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 23(1), pages 33-46.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ollinger, Michael & Bovay, John & Guthrie, Joanne & Benicio, Casiano, 2015. "Economic Incentives to Supply Safe Chicken to the National School Lunch Program," Economic Research Report 212888, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Beatty, Timothy & Shimshack, Jay P., 2018. "Monitoring and Enforcement in a Food Safety Context," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273913, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Ollinger, Michael & Taha, Fawzi A., 2015. "U.S. Domestic Salmonella Regulations and Access to European and Other Poultry Export Markets," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 18(A), pages 1-16, July.
    4. Ollinger, Michael & Wilkus, James & Hrdlicka, Megan & Bovay, John, 2017. "Public Disclosure of Tests for Salmonella: The Effects on Food Safety Performance in Chicken Slaughter Establishments," Economic Research Report 262183, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Ollinger, Michael & Bovay, John & Hrdlicka, Megan & Wilkus, James, 2015. "Food-safety test performance and public disclosure: The value of information in encouraging improvements in food safety in the chicken-slaughter industry," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205408, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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