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Fiscal Policy and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism

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  • Nicolas Caramp

    (Department of Economics, University of California Davis)

Abstract

I study the role of fiscal policy in the monetary transmission mechanism. I present a novel decomposition of the equilibrium that links the wealth effect, i.e. the revaluation of households’ financial and human wealth, to the fiscal response to monetary policy. When monetary policy has fiscal consequences, monetary variables affect the timing of aggregate output, while fiscal variables determine its present value and the wealth effect. The general equilibrium dynamics of inflation can significantly amplify the impact of the wealth effect on initial output and inflation, even in a representative agent model. The analysis identifies the slope of the Phillips curve as a crucial determinant of the importance of fiscal policy and monetary-fiscal coordination for the effectiveness of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Caramp, 2020. "Fiscal Policy and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Working Papers 337, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:337
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Monetary Policy and Wealth Effects
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2020-02-18 14:56:48

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    2. Andryushin, S., 2024. "Interest rate policy of the Bank of Russia in conditions of fiscally-dominant regime: Risks and prospects," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 211-219.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Fiscal Policy; Multiple equilibria; Fiscal Theory;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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