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Leverage, Balance Sheet Size and Wholesale Funding

Author

Listed:
  • H. Evren Damar
  • Césaire A. Meh
  • Yaz Terajima

Abstract

Some evidence points to the procyclicality of leverage among financial institutions leading to aggregate volatility. This procyclicality occurs when financial institutions finance their assets with non-equity funding (i.e., debt financed asset expansions). Wholesale funding is an important source of market-based funding that allows some institutions to quickly adjust their leverage. As such, financial institutions that rely on wholesale funding are expected to have higher degrees of leverage procyclicality. Using high frequency balance sheet data for the universe of banks, this study tries to identify (i) if such a positive link exists between the assets and leverage in Canada, (ii) how wholesale funding plays a role for this link, and (iii) market and macroeconomic factors associated with this link. The findings of the empirical analysis suggest that a strong positive link exists between asset growth and leverage growth, and the use to wholesale funding is an important determinant of this relationship. Furthermore, liquidity of several short-term funding markets matters for procyclicality of leverage.

Suggested Citation

  • H. Evren Damar & Césaire A. Meh & Yaz Terajima, 2010. "Leverage, Balance Sheet Size and Wholesale Funding," Staff Working Papers 10-39, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:10-39
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blum, Jürg M., 2008. "Why 'Basel II' may need a leverage ratio restriction," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1699-1707, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial stability; Financial system regulation and policies; Recent economic and financial developments;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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