IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/arx/papers/2007.03980.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Network effects and the appointment of female board members in Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Matthias Raddant
  • Hiroshi Takahashi

Abstract

We investigate the dynamics in the networks of Japanese corporates and its interplay with the appointment of female board members. We find that firms with female board members show homophily with respect to gender and often have above average profitability. We also find that new appointments of women are more likely at boards which observe female board members at other firms to which they are tied by either ownership relations or corporate board interlocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Raddant & Hiroshi Takahashi, 2020. "Network effects and the appointment of female board members in Japan," Papers 2007.03980, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:2007.03980
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/2007.03980
    File Function: Latest version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bramoullé, Yann & Currarini, Sergio & Jackson, Matthew O. & Pin, Paolo & Rogers, Brian W., 2012. "Homophily and long-run integration in social networks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(5), pages 1754-1786.
    2. Mariateresa Torchia & Andrea Calabrò & Morten Huse, 2011. "Women Directors on Corporate Boards: From Tokenism to Critical Mass," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 102(2), pages 299-317, August.
    3. Farrell, Kathleen A. & Hersch, Philip L., 2005. "Additions to corporate boards: the effect of gender," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(1-2), pages 85-106, March.
    4. Kenneth R. Ahern & Amy K. Dittmar, 2012. "The Changing of the Boards: The Impact on Firm Valuation of Mandated Female Board Representation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(1), pages 137-197.
    5. Kolev, Gueorgui I., 2012. "Underperformance by female CEOs: A more powerful test," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 436-440.
    6. Scott E. Page, 2007. "Prologue to The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies," Introductory Chapters, in: The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies, Princeton University Press.
    7. Raddant, Matthias & Takahashi, Hiroshi, 2020. "Corporate boards, interorganizational ties and profitability: The case of Japan," Economics Working Papers 2020-02, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    8. Kevin Campbell & Antonio Mínguez-Vera, 2008. "Gender Diversity in the Boardroom and Firm Financial Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 83(3), pages 435-451, December.
    9. Erik Devos & Andrew Prevost & John Puthenpurackal, 2009. "Are Interlocked Directors Effective Monitors?," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 38(4), pages 861-887, December.
    10. Nai H. Lamb & Philip Roundy, 2016. "The ‘ties that bind’ board interlocks research: a systematic review," Management Research Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(11), pages 1516-1542, November.
    11. Joanne Horton & Yuval Millo & George Serafeim, 2012. "Resources or Power? Implications of Social Networks on Compensation and Firm Performance," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3-4), pages 399-426, April.
    12. McDowell, John M & Smith, Janet Kiholm, 1992. "The Effect of Gender-Sorting on Propensity to Coauthor: Implications for Academic Promotion," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(1), pages 68-82, January.
    13. Faccio, Mara & Marchica, Maria-Teresa & Mura, Roberto, 2016. "CEO gender, corporate risk-taking, and the efficiency of capital allocation," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 193-209.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:arx:papers:2007.03980. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (arXiv administrators). General contact details of provider: http://arxiv.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.