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Homophily and long-run integration in social networks

Author

Listed:
  • Bramoullé, Yann
  • Currarini, Sergio
  • Jackson, Matthew O.
  • Pin, Paolo
  • Rogers, Brian W.

Abstract

We model network formation when heterogeneous nodes enter sequentially and form connections through both random meetings and network-based search, but with type-dependent biases. We show that there is “long-run integration”, whereby the composition of types in sufficiently old nodesʼ neighborhoods approaches the global type-distribution, provided that the network-based search is unbiased. However, younger nodesʼ connections still reflect the biased meetings process. We derive the type-based degree distributions and group-level homophily patterns when there are two types and location-based biases. Finally, we illustrate aspects of the model with an empirical application to data on citations in physics journals.

Suggested Citation

  • Bramoullé, Yann & Currarini, Sergio & Jackson, Matthew O. & Pin, Paolo & Rogers, Brian W., 2012. "Homophily and long-run integration in social networks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(5), pages 1754-1786.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:147:y:2012:i:5:p:1754-1786
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2012.05.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. S. Redner, 1998. "How popular is your paper? An empirical study of the citation distribution," The European Physical Journal B: Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer;EDP Sciences, vol. 4(2), pages 131-134, July.
    2. Ignacio Palacios-Huerta & Oscar Volij, 2004. "The Measurement of Intellectual Influence," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(3), pages 963-977, May.
    3. Sergio Currarini & Matthew O. Jackson & Paolo Pin, 2009. "An Economic Model of Friendship: Homophily, Minorities, and Segregation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1003-1045, July.
    4. Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni, 2006. "Mobility of inventors and the geography of knowledge spillovers. New evidence on US data," KITeS Working Papers 184, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Oct 2006.
    5. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 1996. "Flows of Knowledge from Universities and Federal Labs: Modeling the Flowof Patent Citations Over Time and Across Institutional and Geographic Boundari," NBER Working Papers 5712, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. László Á. Kóczy & Alexandru Nichifor & Martin Strobel, 2010. "Intellectual Infl uence: Quality versus Quantity," Working Paper Series 1009, Óbuda University, Keleti Faculty of Business and Management.
    7. Matthew O. Jackson & Brian W. Rogers, 2007. "Meeting Strangers and Friends of Friends: How Random Are Social Networks?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 890-915, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Chaney, 2014. "The Network Structure of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(11), pages 3600-3634, November.
    2. Mihaela van der Schaar & Simpson Zhang, 2015. "From Acquaintances to Friends: Homophily and Learning in Networks," Papers 1510.08103, arXiv.org.
    3. Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan, 2016. "The Value of Network Information: Assortative Mixing Makes the Difference," Working Papers halshs-01314954, HAL.
    4. Matthew O. Jackson & Brian W. Rogers & Yves Zenou, 2017. "The Economic Consequences of Social-Network Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(1), pages 49-95, March.
    5. repec:spr:joecth:v:65:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00199-017-1047-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Allouch, Nizar, 2017. "The cost of segregation in (social) networks," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 329-342.
    7. Panebianco, Fabrizio, 2014. "Socialization networks and the transmission of interethnic attitudes," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 583-610.
    8. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Jiabin Wu, 2016. "The Interplay of Cultural Aversion and Assortativity for the Emergence of Cooperation," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 121, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    9. Bruno Deffains & Claude Fluet, 2015. "Social Norms and Legal Design," CIRANO Working Papers 2015s-44, CIRANO.
    10. Lafond, Francois, 2012. "Learning and the structure of citation networks," MERIT Working Papers 071, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    11. Atalay, Enghin, 2013. "Sources of variation in social networks," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 106-131.
    12. Ductor, L & Goyal, S. & Prummer, A., 2018. "Gender & Collaboration," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1820, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    13. Jackson, Matthew O. & Zenou, Yves, 2015. "Games on Networks," Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications, Elsevier.
    14. Irene Crimaldi & Michela Del Vicario & Greg Morrison & Walter Quattrociocchi & Massimo Riccaboni, 2015. "Homophily and Triadic Closure in Evolving Social Networks," Working Papers 3/2015, IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, revised May 2015.
    15. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Jiabin Wuz, 2016. "The Interplay of Cultural Aversion and Assortativity for the Emergence of Cooperation," Department of Economics 0084, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    16. Yang, Jianxia & Wu, John, 2013. "Strategic correlativity and network games," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 663-669.
    17. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli, 2015. "Social coordination with locally observable types," Department of Economics 0051, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    18. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli, 2018. "Social coordination with locally observable types," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 65(4), pages 975-1009, June.
    19. König, Michael David, 2016. "The formation of networks with local spillovers and limited observability," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.
    20. Kibae Kim & Jörn Altmann, 2015. "Effect of Homophily on Network Evolution," TEMEP Discussion Papers 2015121, Seoul National University; Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP), revised Mar 2017.
    21. repec:eee:gamebe:v:103:y:2017:i:c:p:286-312 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. repec:bla:ijethy:v:13:y:2017:i:3:p:255-267 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. repec:gam:jgames:v:9:y:2018:i:4:p:83-:d:176957 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Sanjeev Goyal, 2015. "Networks in Economics: A Perspective on the Literature," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1548, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    25. repec:eee:eecrev:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:1-18 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Network formation; Social networks; Homophily; Integration; Degree distribution; Citations;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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