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GINI Intermediate Report WP 3: Drivers of Growing Inequality

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriele Ballarino

    () (Dipartimento di Studi del Lavoro)

  • Francesco Bogliacino

    () (Escuela de Administración, Universidad Konrad Lorenz)

  • Michela Braga

    () (Facolta' di Scienze Politiche (DEAS), Universita' degli Studi di Milano)

  • Massimiliano Bratti

    () (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche Aziendali e Stastistiche (DEAS), University of Milan)

  • Daniele Checchi

    () (Universita'degli Studi di Milano, Facolta'di Scienze)

  • Antonio Filippin

    () (Department of Economics and Business, University of Milan, IZA)

  • Virginia Maestri

    ()

  • Elena Meschi

    () (Institute of Education ,Room 405, University of London)

  • Francesco Scervini

    () (Collegio Carlo Alberto, Università degli Studi, Torino)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriele Ballarino & Francesco Bogliacino & Michela Braga & Massimiliano Bratti & Daniele Checchi & Antonio Filippin & Virginia Maestri & Elena Meschi & Francesco Scervini, 2012. "GINI Intermediate Report WP 3: Drivers of Growing Inequality," GINI Discussion Papers wp3, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:wp3
    as

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    File URL: http://archive.uva-aias.net/uploaded_files/publications/IntermediateWorkPackage3Report-1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dan Andrews & Aida Caldera Sánchez & Åsa Johansson, 2011. "Housing Markets and Structural Policies in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 836, OECD Publishing.
    2. Giovanni Dosi & Marco Grazzi & Chiara Tomasi & Alessandro Zeli, 2012. "Turbulence underneath the big calm? The micro-evidence behind Italian productivity dynamics," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 1043-1067, November.
    3. James B. Davies & Susanna Sandström & Anthony Shorrocks & Edward N. Wolff, 2011. "The Level and Distribution of Global Household Wealth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 223-254, March.
    4. Daron Acemoglu, 1998. "Why Do New Technologies Complement Skills? Directed Technical Change and Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1055-1089.
    5. Matthew Brzozowski & Martin Gervais & Paul Klein & Michio Suzuki, 2010. "Consumption, Income, and Wealth Inequality in Canada," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 52-75, January.
    6. Daniel Cohen & Marcelo Soto, 2007. "Growth and human capital: good data, good results," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 51-76, March.
    7. André Decoster & Jason Loughrey & Cathal O'Donoghue & Dirk Verwerft, 2010. "How regressive are indirect taxes? A microsimulation analysis for five European countries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 326-350.
    8. Paul Bingley & Lorenzo Cappellari & Niels Westergård-Nielsen, 2011. "Flexicurity, Wage Dynamics and Inequality over the Life-Cycle," CESifo Working Paper Series 3561, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. David Card & John E. DiNardo, 2002. "Skill-Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(4), pages 733-783, October.
    10. Daniele Checchi & Vitorocco Peragine & Laura Serlenga, 2008. "Income Inequality and Opportunity Inequality in Europe," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(5), pages 263-292, September.
    11. Brian Burgoon & Bea Cantillon & Giacomo Corneo & Marloes Graaf-zijl & Tony Fahey & Horn, D. & Bram Lancee & Virginia Maestri & Ive Marx & Abigail Mcknight & Márton Medgyesi & Elena Meschi & Michelle N, 2011. "Inequalities' Impacts: State of the Art Review," GINI Discussion Papers re1, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    12. Philippe Aghion, 2002. "Schumpeterian Growth Theory and the Dynamics of Income Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 855-882, May.
    13. David Domeij & Martin Floden, 2010. "Inequality Trends in Sweden 1978-2004," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 179-208, January.
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