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Inequalities' Impacts: State of the Art Review

  • Brian Burgoon

    ()

  • Bea Cantillon

    ()

    (Departement Sociale Wetenschappen, Universiteit van Antwerpen, Centrum voor Sociaal Beleid Herman Deleeck)

  • Giacomo Corneo

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Freie Universität Berlin)

  • Marloes Graaf-zijl

    ()

    (Sector 3 Groei, Kennis en Structuur, Centraal Planbureau)

  • Tony Fahey

    ()

  • Horn, D.
  • Bram Lancee

    ()

    (Research unit Migration, Integration, Transnationalization, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB))

  • Virginia Maestri

    ()

  • Ive Marx

    ()

    (Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp)

  • Abigail Mcknight

    ()

    (London School of Economics, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion)

  • Márton Medgyesi

    ()

  • Elena Meschi

    ()

    (Institute of Education ,Room 405, University of London)

  • Michelle Norris

    ()

    (Extension at the Champaign Center, University of Illinois)

  • Brian Nolan

    ()

    (School of Applied Social Science, University College Dublin)

  • Veruska Oppedisano

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University College London)

  • Olivier Pintelon

    ()

  • Wiemer Salverda

    ()

    (AIAS, Universiteit van Amsterdam)

  • Francesco Scervini

    ()

    (Collegio Carlo Alberto, Università degli Studi, Torino)

  • Herman Werfhorst

    ()

    (FMG / AIAS, Universiteit van Amsterdam)

  • Mechelen, N. Van
  • Tim Rie

    (Centrum voor Sociaal Beleid Herman Deleeck, Universiteit Antwerpen)

  • Verbist, G.
  • Christopher Whelan

    ()

    (Newman Building, School of Sociology)

  • Nessa Winston

    ()

By way of introduction This report provides the fi rm foundation for anchoring the research that will be performed by the GINI project. It subsequently considers the fi elds covered by each of the main work packages: ● inequalities of income, wealth and education, ● social impacts, ● political and cultural impacts, and ● policy effects on and of inequality. Though extensive this review does not pretend to be exhaustive. The review may be “light” in some respects and can be expanded when the analysis evolves. In each of the four fi elds a signifi cant number of discussion papers will be produced, in total well over 100. These will add to the state of the art while also covering new round and generating results that will be incorporated in the Analysis Reports to be prepared for the work packages. In that sense, the current review provides the starting point. At the same time, the existing body of knowledge is broader or deeper depending on the particular fi eld and its tradition of research. The very motivation of GINI’s focused study of the impacts of inequalities is that a systematic study is lacking and relatively little is known about those impacts. This also holds for the complex collection of, the effects that inequality can have on policy making and the contributions that policies can make to mitigating inequalities but also to enhancing them. By contrast, analyses of inequality itself are many, not least because there is a wide array of inequalities; inequalities have become more easily studied comparatively and much of that analysis has a signifi cant descriptive fl avour that includes an extensive discussion of measurement issues. @GINI hopes to go beyond that and cover the impacts of inequalities at the same time

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Paper provided by AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies in its series GINI Discussion Papers with number re1.

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Date of creation: Apr 2011
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Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:re1
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  1. Wößmann, Ludger, 2009. "International evidence on school tracking: A review," Munich Reprints in Economics 19686, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Ludger Woesmann, 2003. "Schooling Resources, Educational Institutions and Student Performance: the International Evidence," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(2), pages 117-170, 05.
  3. Ludger Woessmann, 2007. "Fundamental Determinants of School Efficiency and Equity: German States as a Microcosm for OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 1981, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Wolff, Edward N, 1992. "Changing Inequality of Wealth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 552-58, May.
  5. Wößmann, Ludger, 2008. "Efficiency and equity of European education and training policies," Munich Reprints in Economics 19667, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  6. Ludger Wossmann, 2005. "The effect heterogeneity of central examinations: evidence from TIMSS, TIMSS-Repeat and PISA," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 143-169.
  7. Adrian Wood, 1995. "How Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 57-80, Summer.
  8. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 1968. "Personal Saving in Developing Nations: An Intertemporal Cross‐Section from Asia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 44(2), pages 194-210, 06.
  9. Winegarden, C R, 1979. "Schooling and Income Distribution: Evidence from International Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 46(181), pages 83-87, February.
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