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Exploring educational mobility in Europe

  • Antonio Di Paolo

    ()

    (Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de Bellaterra, Edifici B 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola), Spain & IEB, Barcelona, Spain)

  • José Luís Raymond

    ()

    (Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de Bellaterra, Edifici B 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola), Spain & IEB, Barcelona, Spain)

  • Jorge Calero

    ()

    (Departament d'Economia Política i Hisenda Pública, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain & GIPE, Barcelona, Spain & IEB, Barcelona, Spain)

This paper is concerned with the investigation of the intergenerational mobility of education in several European countries and its changes across birth cohorts (1940-1980) using a new mobility index that considers the total degree of mobility as the weighted sum of mobility with respect to both parents. Moreover, this mobility index enables the analysis of the role of family characteristics as mediating factors in the statistical association between individual and parental education. We find that Nordic countries display lower levels of educational persistence but that the degree of mobility increases over time only in those countries with low initial levels. Moreover, the results suggest that the degree of mobility with respect to fathers and mothers converges to the same level and that family characteristics account for an important part of the statistical association between parental education and children’s schooling; a particular finding is that the most important elements of family characteristics are the family’s socio-economic status and educational assortative mating of the parents.

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File URL: http://www.pcb.ub.es/xreap/aplicacio/fitxers/XREAP2010-11.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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File URL: http://www.pcb.ub.es/xreap/aplicacio/fitxers/XREAP2010-11.pdf
File Function: Revised version, 2010
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Paper provided by Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP) in its series Working Papers with number XREAP2010-11.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision: Oct 2010
Handle: RePEc:xrp:wpaper:xreap2010-11
Contact details of provider: Postal: Espai de Recerca en Economia, Facultat de Ciències Econòmiques i Empresarials, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Tinent Coronel Valenzuela, 1-11, 08034 Barcelona
Phone: +34+934039653
Web page: http://www.pcb.ub.edu/xreap
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  1. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental Education and Child’s Education - A Natural Experiment," Working Papers 200414, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Nicoletti Cheti & Ermisch John F, 2008. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility: Changes across Cohorts in Britain," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-38, January.
  3. Checchi, Daniele & Ichino, Andrea & Rustichini, Aldo, 1999. "More equal but less mobile?: Education financing and intergenerational mobility in Italy and in the US," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 351-393, December.
  4. Guido Heineck & Regina T. Riphahn, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment in Germany: The Last Five Decades," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 37, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  5. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2006. "Accounting for intergenerational income persistence: non-cognitive skills, ability and education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19401, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Philip Oreopoulos & Marianne E. Page, 2006. "The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 729-760, October.
  7. John Hassler & José Vicente Rodríguez Mora & Joseph Zeira, 2003. "Inequality and Mobility," Working Papers 23, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  8. Ganzeboom, H.B.G. & de Graaf, P.M. & Treiman, D.J. & de Leeuw, J., 1992. "A standard international socio-economic index of occupational status," WORC Paper 85970031-d601-46e3-befb-1, Tilburg University, Work and Organization Research Centre.
  9. Hertz Tom & Jayasundera Tamara & Piraino Patrizio & Selcuk Sibel & Smith Nicole & Verashchagina Alina, 2008. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-48, January.
  10. Arnaud Chevalier & Kevin Denny & Dorren McMahon, 2003. "A Multi-Country Study of Inter-Generational Educational Mobility," Working Papers 200314, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  11. Chul-In Lee & Gary Solon, 2006. "Trends in Intergenerational Income Mobility," NBER Working Papers 12007, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
  13. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521793100 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Erik Plug, 2004. "Estimating the Effect of Mother's Schooling on Children's Schooling Using a Sample of Adoptees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 358-368, March.
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