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Let it Rain: Weather Extremes and Household Welfare in Rural Kenya

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  • Wineman, Ayala
  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Ochieng, Justus
  • Kirimi, Lilian

Abstract

Households in rural Kenya are sensitive to weather shocks through their reliance on rain-fed agriculture and livestock. Yet the extent of vulnerability is poorly understood, particularly in reference to extreme weather. This paper uses temporally and spatially disaggregated weather data and three waves of household panel survey data to understand the impact of weather extremes –including periods of high and low rainfall, heat, and wind– on household welfare. Particular attention is paid to heterogeneous effects across agro-ecological regions. We find that all types of extreme weather affect household well-being, although effects sometimes differ for income and calorie estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Wineman, Ayala & Mason, Nicole M. & Ochieng, Justus & Kirimi, Lilian, 2016. "Let it Rain: Weather Extremes and Household Welfare in Rural Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245109, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:245109
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.245109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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