IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Modelling physical quantities of food and nutrients consumed from aggregate data – with an application to Finland

  • Irz, Xavier T.

Anticipating the impact of changes in economic incentives on dietary quality and nutritional health requires knowledge of how physical quantities of food consumed respond to price and income variations. A problem arises, however, because physical quantities are: 1- not consistent aggregates in demand models; and 2- not measured at final/retail level in national statistics. The paper develops a solution by establishing explicitly the theoretical link between composite demand and physical quantities, from which a novel empirical approach to the estimation of nutrient elasticities is derived. It is applied to Finnish aggregate data from the National Accounts and Food Balance Sheets over the 1975-2006 period, and the results are used to assess the potential effectiveness of several incentive-based nutritional policy instruments.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50324
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China with number 50324.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:50324
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Moschini, GianCarlo & Moro, D., 1993. "Food Demand System for Canada, A," Staff General Research Papers 12753, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Deaton, Angus, 1990. "Price elasticities from survey data : Extensions and Indonesian results," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 281-309, June.
  3. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Allais, Olivier & Bertail, Patrice & Nichele, Veronique, 2008. "The Effects of a "Fat Tax" on the Nutrient Intake of French Households," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43967, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Beatty, Timothy K. M. & LaFrance, Jeffrey T, 2005. "U.S. demand for food and nutrition in the 20th century," CUDARE Working Paper Series 1002R, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy, revised Aug 2005.
  6. Moschini, G. & Moro, D., 1993. "A Food demand System for Canada," Papers 1-93, Gouvernement du Canada - Agriculture Canada.
  7. Srinivasan, C.S. & Irz, Xavier & Shankar, Bhavani, 2006. "An assessment of the potential consumption impacts of WHO dietary norms in OECD countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 53-77, February.
  8. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  9. Bouamra-Mechemache, Zohra & Réquillart, Vincent & Soregaroli, Claudio & Trévisiol, Audrey, 2008. "Demand for dairy products in the EU," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 644-656, December.
  10. Ian Crawford & François Laisney & Ian Preston, 2002. "Estimation of household demand systems with theoretically compatible Engel curves and unit value specifications," IFS Working Papers W02/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  11. Smed, Sinne & Jensen, Jorgen D. & Denver, Sigrid, 2007. "Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 624-639.
  12. Reed, Albert J. & Levedahl, J. William & Clark, J. Stephen, 2003. "Commercial Disappearance and Composite Demand for Food with an Application to U.S. Meats," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(01), April.
  13. Kuo S. Huang, 1996. "Nutrient Elasticities in a Complete Food Demand System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 21-29.
  14. Timothy K.M. Beatty & Jeffrey T. LaFrance, 2005. "United States Demand for Food and Nutrition in the Twentieth Century," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1159-1166.
  15. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
  16. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1996. "Are Recessions Good For Your Health?," NBER Working Papers 5570, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Deaton, Angus, 1987. "Estimation of own- and cross-price elasticities from household survey data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 7-30.
  18. Shin-Yi Chou & Michael Grossman & Henry Saffer, 2002. "An Economic Analysis of Adult Obesity: Results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 9247, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Alain Carpentier & Hervé Guyomard, 2001. "Unconditional Elasticities in Two-Stage Demand Systems: An Approximate Solution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 222-229.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:50324. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.