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Competition and prosociality: A field experiment in Ghana

Author

Listed:
  • Grosch, Kerstin
  • Ibanez, Marcela
  • Viceisza, Angelino

Abstract

Competitive bonuses are commonly used to promote higher productivity in the workplace. Yet, these types of incentives could have negative spillovers on coworkers' prosocial behavior in subsequent tasks. To investigate this question, we conduct a lab-in-the-eld experiment in Ghana. In a between-subjects design, participants complete a real-eort task under a competitive, threshold, or random payment while holding payment dierentials constant across treatments. Before and after, we measure prosociality through a public goods and a social value orientation game. Competition reduces prosociality when the dispersion of payments is high. However, when there is less at stake, competition does not aect prosociality.

Suggested Citation

  • Grosch, Kerstin & Ibanez, Marcela & Viceisza, Angelino, 2017. "Competition and prosociality: A field experiment in Ghana," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 266141, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:gagfdp:266141
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.266141
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Grosch, Kerstin & Rau, Holger A., 2017. "Do discriminatory pay regimes unleash antisocial behavior?," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 315, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    Institutional and Behavioral Economics; Labor and Human Capital;

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