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Inspection Technology, Detection, And Compliance: Evidence From Florida Restaurant Inspections

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  • Jin, Ginger Zhe
  • Lee, Jungmin

Abstract

In this article, we show that a small innovation in inspection technology can make substantial differences in inspection outcomes. For restaurant hygiene inspections, the state of Florida has introduced a handheld electronic device, the portable digital assistant (PDA), which reminds inspectors of 1,000 potential violations that may be checked for. Using inspection records from July 2003 to June 2009, we find that the adoption of PDA led to 11% more detected violations and subsequently restaurants may have gradually increased their compliance efforts. We also find that PDA use is significantly correlated with a reduction in restaurant-related foodborne disease outbreaks.
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Suggested Citation

  • Jin, Ginger Zhe & Lee, Jungmin, 2014. "Inspection Technology, Detection, And Compliance: Evidence From Florida Restaurant Inspections," Working Papers 190672, American Association of Wine Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aawewp:190672
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/190672
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jin, Ginger Zhe & Lee, Jungmin, 2014. "A Tale Of Repetition:Lessons From Florida Restaurant Inspections," Working Papers 190671, American Association of Wine Economists.
    2. repec:bpj:bejtec:v:18:y:2018:i:1:p:12:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inspection technology; PDA; Regulation; Detection; Compliance; Restaurant hygiene; Food Security and Poverty; Health Economics and Policy; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; D81; D82; H75; I18; K32; L51;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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