IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pma1701.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Leticia J. Marteleto

Personal Details

First Name:Leticia
Middle Name:J.
Last Name:Marteleto
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1701
https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/zika/index.php
Terminal Degree: (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

University of Texas at Austin-Population Research Center

http://prc.utexas.edu
Austin

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alberto Palloni & Laetícia De Souza & Letícia Junqueira Marteleto, 2017. "L'influence de la famille sur le tabagisme chez les jeunes au Brésil," One Pager French 328, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  2. Alberto Palloni & Laetícia De Souza & Letícia Junqueira Marteleto, 2016. "A influência dos pais e irmãos sobre o tabagismo entre os jovens no Brasil," One Pager Portuguese 328, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  3. Alberto Palloni & Laetícia De Souza & Letícia Junqueira Marteleto, 2016. "Familial effects on youth smoking in Brazil," Working Papers 146, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  4. Vimal Ranchhod & David Lam & Murray Leibbrandt & Leticia Marteleto, 2011. "Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression," SALDRU Working Papers 59, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  5. Letícia Marteleto, 2004. "Desigualdade intergeracional de oportunidades educacionais: uma análise da matrícula e escolaridade das crianças brasileiras," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td242, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
  6. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2004. "A dinâmica da escolaridade das crianças brasileiras durante a transição demográfica: aumento no tamanho da coorte versus diminuição no tamanho da família," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td243, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Articles

  1. Letícia J. Marteleto & Abigail Weitzman & Raquel Zanatta Coutinho & Sandra Valongueiro Alves, 2017. "Women's Reproductive Intentions and Behaviors during the Zika Epidemic in Brazil," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 43(2), pages 199-227, June.
  2. C. Emily Hendrick & Leticia Marteleto, 2017. "Maternal Household Decision-Making Autonomy and Adolescent Education in Honduras," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(3), pages 415-439, June.
  3. Letícia J. Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2016. "Racial Inequality in Education in Brazil: A Twins Fixed-Effects Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1185-1205, August.
  4. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820.
  5. Leticia Marteleto, 2012. "Educational Inequality by Race in Brazil, 1982–2007: Structural Changes and Shifts in Racial Classification," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 337-358, February.
  6. Leticia Marteleto, 2012. "Erratum to: Educational Inequality by Race in Brazil, 1982–2007: Structural Changes and Shifts in Racial Classification," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 1155-1155, August.
  7. Letícia Marteleto & Laetícia Souza, 2012. "The Changing Impact of Family Size on Adolescents’ Schooling: Assessing the Exogenous Variation in Fertility Using Twins in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(4), pages 1453-1477, November.
  8. Leticia Marteleto, 2010. "Family size, adolescents’ schooling and the Demographic Transition: Evidence from Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(15), pages 421-444.
  9. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2008. "Stages of the Demographic Transition from a Child's Perspective: Family Size, Cohort Size, and Children's Resources," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 225-252, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Vimal Ranchhod & David Lam & Murray Leibbrandt & Leticia Marteleto, 2011. "Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression," SALDRU Working Papers 59, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820.
    2. Eva O. Arceo-Gómez & Raymundo M. Campos-Vázquez, 2011. "Teenage Pregnacy in Mexico: Evolution and Consequences," Working papers DTE 516, CIDE, División de Economía.
    3. Kakal, T., 2015. "A tale of two sisters : Investigating the socio-economic outcomes of teen childbearing in South Africa," ISS Working Papers - General Series 604, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    4. Nicola Branson & Clare Hofmeyr & David Lam, 2014. "Progress through school and the determinants of school dropout in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 106-126, January.
    5. Nicola Branson & Cally Ardington & Murray Leibbrandt, 2011. "Health outcomes for children born to teen mothers in Cape Town, South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 55, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    6. David SAHN & Catalina HERRERA, 2014. "The Impact of Early Childbearing on Schooling and Cognitive Skills among Young Women in Madagascar," Working Papers 201428, CERDI.
    7. Herrera Catalina & E. Sahn David, 2017. "Working Paper 281 - Early Childbearing, School Attainment and Cognitive Skills," Working Paper Series 2398, African Development Bank.
    8. Elina Pradhan & David Canning, 2016. "The Effect of Schooling on Teenage Fertility: Evidence from the 1994 Education Reform in Ethiopia," PGDA Working Papers 12816, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    9. Stephanie R. Psaki & Erica Soler-Hampejsek & Jyotirmoy Saha & Barbara S. Mensch & Sajeda Amin, 2019. "The Effects of Adolescent Childbearing on Literacy and Numeracy in Bangladesh, Malawi, and Zambia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(5), pages 1899-1929, October.
    10. Pinar Mine GUNES & Magda TSANEVA, 2020. "The Effects of Teenage Childbearing on Education, Physical Health, and Mental Distress: Evidence from Mexico," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 86(2), pages 183-206, June.
    11. Gunes, Pinar & Tsaneva, Magda, 2016. "The Effects of Early Pregnancy on Education, Physical Health and Mental Distress: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2016-14, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    12. Catalina Herrera Almanza & David E. Sahn, 2018. "Early Childbearing, School Attainment, and Cognitive Skills: Evidence From Madagascar," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(2), pages 643-668, April.

  2. Letícia Marteleto, 2004. "Desigualdade intergeracional de oportunidades educacionais: uma análise da matrícula e escolaridade das crianças brasileiras," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td242, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

    Cited by:

    1. Danielle Machado & João Ricardo Rodrigues Moreira, 2016. "Non-cognitive abilities and pre-school: a case study for children in Brazil," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11, in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.),Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 33, pages 605-618, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.

  3. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2004. "A dinâmica da escolaridade das crianças brasileiras durante a transição demográfica: aumento no tamanho da coorte versus diminuição no tamanho da família," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td243, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

    Cited by:

    1. Andréa Zaitune Curi & Naércio Aquino Menezes Filho, 2007. "As Causas Da Estagnação Educacional Recente No Brasil," Anais do XXXV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 35th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 127, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

Articles

  1. Letícia J. Marteleto & Abigail Weitzman & Raquel Zanatta Coutinho & Sandra Valongueiro Alves, 2017. "Women's Reproductive Intentions and Behaviors during the Zika Epidemic in Brazil," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 43(2), pages 199-227, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Rangel, Marcos & Nobles, Jenna & Hamoudi, Amar, 2019. "Brazil's Missing Infants: Zika Risk Changes Reproductive Behavior," SocArXiv fu8bp, Center for Open Science.
    2. Letícia J. Marteleto & Gilvan Guedes & Raquel Z. Coutinho & Abigail Weitzman, 2020. "Live Births and Fertility Amid the Zika Epidemic in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 843-872, June.

  2. C. Emily Hendrick & Leticia Marteleto, 2017. "Maternal Household Decision-Making Autonomy and Adolescent Education in Honduras," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(3), pages 415-439, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Ray, Rita, 2020. "Mother’s autonomy and child anemia: A case study from India," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 112(C).

  3. Letícia J. Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2016. "Racial Inequality in Education in Brazil: A Twins Fixed-Effects Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1185-1205, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Laidley & Benjamin Domingue & Piyapat Sinsub & Kathleen Mullan Harris & Dalton Conley, 2019. "New Evidence of Skin Color Bias and Health Outcomes Using Sibling Difference Models: A Research Note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(2), pages 753-762, April.

  4. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820.

    Cited by:

    1. Sylvain Dessy, Setou Diarra, Roland Pongou & Setou Diarra & Roland Pongou, 2016. "Adolescent Brides and Grooms' Education: Theory and Evidence," Cahiers de recherche 1610, Centre de recherche sur les risques, les enjeux économiques, et les politiques publiques.
    2. Dessy, Sylvain & Diarra, Setou & Pongou, Roland, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms' Education," MPRA Paper 77326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Letícia J. Marteleto & Gilvan Guedes & Raquel Z. Coutinho & Abigail Weitzman, 2020. "Live Births and Fertility Amid the Zika Epidemic in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 843-872, June.
    4. Dessy, Sylvain & Pongou, Roland & Diarra, Setou, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms' Education," MPRA Paper 77526, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. C. Emily Hendrick & Leticia Marteleto, 2017. "Maternal Household Decision-Making Autonomy and Adolescent Education in Honduras," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(3), pages 415-439, June.

  5. Leticia Marteleto, 2012. "Educational Inequality by Race in Brazil, 1982–2007: Structural Changes and Shifts in Racial Classification," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 337-358, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew M. Francis & Maria Tannuri-Pianto, 2013. "Endogenous Race in Brazil: Affirmative Action and the Construction of Racial Identity among Young Adults," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(4), pages 731-753.
    2. Barber, Sharrelle & Diez Roux, Ana V. & Cardoso, Letícia & Santos, Simone & Toste, Veronica & James, Sherman & Barreto, Sandhi & Schmidt, Maria & Giatti, Luana & Chor, Dora, 2018. "At the intersection of place, race, and health in Brazil: Residential segregation and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 199(C), pages 67-76.
    3. Castro Aristizabal, Geovanny & Giménez, Gregorio & Pérez Ximénez-de-Embún, Domingo, 2018. "Estimation of factors conditioning the acquisition of academic skills in Latin America in the presence of endogeneity," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
    4. Aliya Saperstein & Aaron Gullickson, 2013. "A “Mulatto Escape Hatch” in the United States? Examining Evidence of Racial and Social Mobility During the Jim Crow Era," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(5), pages 1921-1942, October.
    5. Mauricio Cortez Reis, 2016. "Fields Of Study And The Earnings Gap By Race In Brazil," Anais do XLII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 42nd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 199, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    6. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2019. "Secondary School Enrolment and Teenage Childbearing: Evidence from Brazilian Municipalities," Working Papers 2019016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    7. Andreia Maria Araújo Drummond & Efigênia Ferreira Ferreira & Viviane Elisangela Gomes & Wagner Marcenes, 2015. "Inequality of Experience of Dental Caries between Different Ethnic Groups of Brazilians Aged 15 to 19 Years," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(12), pages 1-9, December.
    8. Perreira, Krista M. & Telles, Edward E., 2014. "The color of health: Skin color, ethnoracial classification, and discrimination in the health of Latin Americans," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 241-250.
    9. Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez & Eduardo M. Medina-Cortina, 2019. "Skin Color and Social Mobility: Evidence From Mexico," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(1), pages 321-343, February.
    10. Aaron Gullickson & Florencia Torche, 2014. "Patterns of Racial and Educational Assortative Mating in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 835-856, June.
    11. Letícia J. Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2016. "Racial Inequality in Education in Brazil: A Twins Fixed-Effects Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1185-1205, August.
    12. Paolo Veneri & Andre Comandon & Miquel-Àngel Garcia-López & Michiel N. Daams, 2020. "What do divided cities have in common? An international comparison of income segregation," Working Papers 2020/07, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    13. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2016. "Access to education and teenage childbearing," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/15, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
    14. Andrew Francis-Tan & Zheng Mu, 2019. "Racial Revolution: Understanding the Resurgence of Ethnic Minority Identity in Modern China," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(5), pages 733-769, October.
    15. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2016. "Access to Education and Teenage Pregnancy," CINCH Working Paper Series 1604, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Aug 2016.

  6. Leticia Marteleto, 2012. "Erratum to: Educational Inequality by Race in Brazil, 1982–2007: Structural Changes and Shifts in Racial Classification," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 1155-1155, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Aaron Gullickson & Florencia Torche, 2014. "Patterns of Racial and Educational Assortative Mating in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 835-856, June.

  7. Letícia Marteleto & Laetícia Souza, 2012. "The Changing Impact of Family Size on Adolescents’ Schooling: Assessing the Exogenous Variation in Fertility Using Twins in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(4), pages 1453-1477, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin G. Gibbs & Joseph Workman & Douglas B. Downey, 2016. "The (Conditional) Resource Dilution Model: State- and Community-Level Modifications," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 723-748, June.
    2. Ea Hoppe Blaabæk & Mads Meier Jæger & Joseph Molitoris, 2020. "Family Size and Educational Attainment: Cousins, Contexts, and Compensation," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 36(3), pages 575-600, July.
    3. Shuang Chen, 2020. "Parental Investment After the Birth of a Sibling: The Effect of Family Size in Low-Fertility China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(6), pages 2085-2111, December.
    4. Letícia J. Marteleto & Gilvan Guedes & Raquel Z. Coutinho & Abigail Weitzman, 2020. "Live Births and Fertility Amid the Zika Epidemic in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 843-872, June.
    5. Jaqueline Oliveira, 2016. "Fertility, Migration, and Maternal Wages: Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(3), pages 377-398.
    6. Dang, Hai-Anh & Rogers, Halsey, 2013. "The decision to invest in child quality over quantity : household size and household investment in education in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6487, The World Bank.
    7. Damian Clarke, 2018. "Children And Their Parents: A Review Of Fertility And Causality," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 518-540, April.
    8. Sahawal Alidou & Marijke Verpoorten, 2019. "Family size and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa: testing the quantity-quality trade-off," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 1353-1399, October.
    9. Stefan Öberg, 2015. "Sibship size and height before, during, and after the fertility decline," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(2), pages 29-74.
    10. Seongsoo Choi & Riley Taiji & Manting Chen & Christiaan Monden, 2020. "Cohort Trends in the Association Between Sibship Size and Educational Attainment in 26 Low-Fertility Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 1035-1062, June.
    11. Ridhi Kashyap & Julia Behrman, 2020. "Gender Discrimination and Excess Female Under-5 Mortality in India: A New Perspective Using Mixed-Sex Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(6), pages 2143-2167, December.

  8. Leticia Marteleto, 2010. "Family size, adolescents’ schooling and the Demographic Transition: Evidence from Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(15), pages 421-444.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Dribe & Jonas Helgertz & Bart van de Putte, 2012. "Intergenerational social mobility during modernisation: a micro-level study of a community in southern Sweden 1830-1968," Working Papers 12013, Economic History Society.
    2. Martin Dribe & Jan Van Bavel & Cameron Campbell, 2012. "Social mobility and demographic behaviour: Long term perspectives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(8), pages 173-190.
    3. Sophie Hedges & David W. Lawson & Jim Todd & Mark Urassa & Rebecca Sear, 2019. "Sharing the Load: How Do Coresident Children Influence the Allocation of Work and Schooling in Northwestern Tanzania?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(5), pages 1931-1956, October.

  9. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2008. "Stages of the Demographic Transition from a Child's Perspective: Family Size, Cohort Size, and Children's Resources," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 225-252, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Ernesto Amaral & Bernardo Queiroz & Júlia Calazans, 2015. "Demographic changes, educational improvements, and earnings in Brazil and Mexico," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-21, December.
    2. Quanbao Jiang & Xiaomin Li & Shuzhuo Li & Marcus W. Feldman, 2016. "China’s Marriage Squeeze: A Decomposition into Age and Sex Structure," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 793-807, June.
    3. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820.
    4. Rangel, Marcos & Nobles, Jenna & Hamoudi, Amar, 2019. "Brazil's Missing Infants: Zika Risk Changes Reproductive Behavior," SocArXiv fu8bp, Center for Open Science.
    5. David Lam, 2011. "How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons From 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1231-1262, November.
    6. Amaral, Ernesto F. L. & Potter, Joseph E & Hamermesh, Daniel & Rios-Neto, Eduardo L G, 2013. "Age, education, and earnings in the course of Brazilian development: Does composition matter?," OSF Preprints y7asb, Center for Open Science.
    7. Tony Fahey, 2015. "Family Patterns and Social Inequality among Children in the United States 1940-2012: A Re-assessment," Working Papers 201523, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Bongoh Kye, 2012. "Cohort Effects or Period Effects? Fertility Decline in South Korea in the Twentieth Century," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(3), pages 387-415, June.
    9. Ernesto F. L. Amaral & Bernardo L. Queiroz & Julia A. Calazans, 2015. "Effects of Demographic and Educational Changes on the Labor Markets of Brazil and Mexico," Working Papers WR-1089, RAND Corporation.
    10. Jorge Ivan Gonzalez & Mauricio Perez Salazar, 2019. "Mercados y Bienestar. Ensayos en memoria de homero cuevas," Books, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Facultad de Economía, number 79, December.
    11. Patrick Präg & Seongsoo Choi & Christiaan Monden, 2020. "The sibsize revolution in an international context: Declining social disparities in the number of siblings in 26 countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 43(17), pages 461-500.
    12. Letícia Marteleto & Laetícia Souza, 2012. "The Changing Impact of Family Size on Adolescents’ Schooling: Assessing the Exogenous Variation in Fertility Using Twins in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(4), pages 1453-1477, November.
    13. Ingco, Katrina Nicole & Pilitro, Ver Lyon Yojie, 2016. "Stuck at a Crossroad: A Microeconometric Analysis of Fertility and Married Female Labor Force Supply in the Philippines," MPRA Paper 73351, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Amaral, Ernesto F. L. & Faustino, Samantha Haussmann Rodarte & Gonçalves, Guilherme Quaresma & Queiroz, Bernardo L, 2019. "Economic sector, demographic composition, educational attainment, and earnings in Brazil," OSF Preprints vz4sa, Center for Open Science.
    15. Leticia Marteleto, 2012. "Educational Inequality by Race in Brazil, 1982–2007: Structural Changes and Shifts in Racial Classification," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 337-358, February.
    16. Tony Fahey, 2014. "Family Size as a Social Leveller for Children in the Second Demographic Transition," Working Papers 201413, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2011-11-28
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-11-28
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2011-11-28
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2011-11-28
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2016-08-14
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2011-11-28
  7. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2016-08-14
  8. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2011-11-28

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Leticia J. Marteleto should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.