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Family size and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa: testing the quantity-quality trade-off

Author

Listed:
  • Sahawal Alidou

    () (University of Antwerp
    KU Leuven)

  • Marijke Verpoorten

    () (University of Antwerp
    KU Leuven)

Abstract

Many family planning programs are based on the idea that small families lead to improved development outcomes, such as more schooling for children. Because of endogeneity issues, this idea is however difficult to verify. A handful of studies have made use of twin birth to deal with the endogeneity of family size. We do so for sub-Saharan African countries. In a compilation of 86 survey rounds from 34 countries, we exploit the birth of twins to study the effect of a quasi-exogenous increase in family size on the schooling of children at the first, second and third birth order. Our findings do not support the generally assumed negative effect of family size on schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Sahawal Alidou & Marijke Verpoorten, 2019. "Family size and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa: testing the quantity-quality trade-off," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 1353-1399, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:32:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-019-00730-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-019-00730-z
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family size; Schooling; Quantity-quality trade-off; Sub-Saharan Africa;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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