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The Effects of Early Pregnancy on Education, Physical Health and Mental Distress: Evidence from Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Gunes, Pinar

    () (University of Alberta, Department of Economics)

  • Tsaneva, Magda

    () (Clark University)

Abstract

This paper estimates the effects of early pregnancy on education, labor force participation, physical and mental health, and preventive health behaviors of young girls in Mexico. In order to overcome the selection bias, this paper employs a propensity score matching analysis using a nationally representative longitudinal data from the Mexican Family Life Survey. In the short run, early pregnancy increases the probability of being overweight and anemic, and reduces physical activity; however, it does not affect mental health. The results also demonstrate that early pregnancy increases the probability of dropping out of high school and reduces labor force participation. Finally, the effect on being overweight operate through reduced education and physical activity, and moreover, the effect persists in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunes, Pinar & Tsaneva, Magda, 2016. "The Effects of Early Pregnancy on Education, Physical Health and Mental Distress: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2016-14, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2016_014
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    File URL: https://sites.ualberta.ca/~econwps/2016/wp2016-14.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Murray, Tim, 2019. "Defined benefit pensions and homeownership in the post-Great Recession era," MPRA Paper 92601, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Magda Tsaneva & Pinar Mine Gunes, 2020. "The effect of violent crime on teenage pregnancy in Mexico," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 141-164, March.
    3. Pinar Mine GUNES & Magda TSANEVA, 2020. "The Effects of Teenage Childbearing on Education, Physical Health, and Mental Distress: Evidence from Mexico," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 86(2), pages 183-206, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early Pregnancy; Human Capital; Mexico;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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