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How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons From 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History

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  • David Lam

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  • David Lam, 2011. "How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons From 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1231-1262, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:48:y:2011:i:4:p:1231-1262 DOI: 10.1007/s13524-011-0070-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. D. Gale Johnson, 2000. "Population, Food, and Knowledge," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 1-14, March.
    2. Pritchett, Lant H. & DEC, 1994. "Desired fertility and the impact of population policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1273, The World Bank.
    3. David Lam & Cally Ardington & Nicola Branson & Murray Leibbrandt, 2013. "Credit Constraints and the Racial Gap in Post-Secondary Education in South Africa," NBER Working Papers 19607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Samuel Preston, 1976. "Family sizes of children and family sizes of women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 13(1), pages 105-114, February.
    5. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 279-288, Part II, .
    6. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Price Indexes, Inequality, and the Measurement of World Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 5-34.
    7. Jones, Ronald & Kierzkowski, Henryk & Lurong, Chen, 2005. "What does evidence tell us about fragmentation and outsourcing?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 305-316.
    8. repec:pri:rpdevs:presidential%20address%2017january%202010%20all is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Tuong Nhu Che & Tom Kompas & Neil Vousden, 2006. "Market Reform, Incentives and Economic Development in Vietnamese Rice Production," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 277-301, June.
    10. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2008. "Stages of the Demographic Transition from a Child's Perspective: Family Size, Cohort Size, and Children's Resources," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 225-252.
    11. Michael Kremer, 1993. "Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 681-716.
    12. David Lam & Suzanne Duryea, 1999. "Effects of Schooling on Fertility, Labor Supply, and Investments in Children, with Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 160-192.
    13. Ronald Lee, 2003. "The Demographic Transition: Three Centuries of Fundamental Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 167-190, Fall.
    14. Willis, Robert J, 1973. "A New Approach to the Economic Theory of Fertility Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 14-64, Part II, .
    15. Pingali, Prabhu L & Xuan, Vo-Tong, 1992. "Vietnam: Decollectivization and Rice Productivity Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(4), pages 697-718, July.
    16. Shaohua Chen & Martin Ravallion, 2010. "The Developing World is Poorer than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight Against Poverty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1577-1625.
    17. Malthus, Thomas Robert, 1798. "An Essay on the Principle of Population," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number malthus1798, December.
    18. Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
    19. Karen Mason, 1997. "Explaining fertility transitions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(4), pages 443-454, November.
    20. William Petersen, 1971. "The Malthus-Godwin debate, then and now," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 8(1), pages 13-26, February.
    21. John Casterline & Laila El-Zeini, 2007. "The estimation of Unwanted Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 729-745, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Lichter, 2013. "Integration or Fragmentation? Racial Diversity and the American Future," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 359-391, April.
    2. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820, April.
    3. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0595-x is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hendrik P. Van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2012. "What is on a Demographer’s Mind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(16), pages 363-408, May.
    5. Stan Becker, 2013. "Has the World Really Survived the Population Bomb? (Commentary on “How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons From 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History”)," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2173-2181, December.
    6. Isabel Günther & Kenneth Harttgen, 2013. "Desired Fertility and Children Born across Time and Space," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 144, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    7. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Chakraborty, Shankha, 2014. "Contraception and the Fertility Transition," MPRA Paper 53129, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9842-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Isabel Günther & Kenneth Harttgen, 2016. "Desired Fertility and Number of Children Born Across Time and Space," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 55-83, February.
    10. David Lam, 2013. "Reply to Stan Becker, “Has the World Really Survived the Population Bomb? (Commentary on “How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons from 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History”)”," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2183-2186, December.
    11. David Rosnick, 2014. "The Consequences of Increased Population Growth for Climate Change," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2014-18, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    12. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0665-9 is not listed on IDEAS

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