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Age, education, and earnings in the course of Brazilian development: Does composition matter?

  • Ernesto Friedrich de Lima Amaral

    (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil)

  • Joseph E. Potter

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Daniel Hamermesh

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Eduardo Rios-Neto

    (Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil)

No abstract is available for this item.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol28/20/28-20.pdf
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Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 28 (2013)
Issue (Month): 20 (March)
Pages: 581-612

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:28:y:2013:i:20
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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  1. Berger, Mark C, 1985. "The Effect of Cohort Size on Earnings Growth: A Reexamination of the Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 561-73, June.
  2. Robert Shimer, 1999. "The Impact of Young Workers on the Aggregate Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 7306, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Giorgio Brunello, 2010. "The effects of cohort size on European earnings," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 273-290, January.
  4. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1997. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed the Labor Market?," NBER Working Papers 5956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Pia N. Malaney, 1999. "Demographic Change and Economic Growth in Asia," CID Working Papers 15, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  6. David Lam & Letícia Marteleto, 2008. "Stages of the Demographic Transition from a Child's Perspective: Family Size, Cohort Size, and Children's Resources," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 225-252.
  7. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Guenther Fink & Jocelyn E. Finlay, 2007. "Fertility, Female Labor Force Participation, and the Demographic Dividend," PGDA Working Papers 2507, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  8. David E. BLOOM & Jocelyn E. FINLAY, 2009. "Demographic Change and Economic Growth in Asia," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 4(1), pages 45-64.
  9. Robert J. Barro & Jong-Wha Lee, 2000. "International Data on Educational Attainment Updates and Implications," NBER Working Papers 7911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. James H. Grant & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1980. "Labor Market Competition among Youths, White Women, and Others," NBER Working Papers 0519, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Skans, Oskar Nordstrom, 2005. "Age effects in Swedish local labor markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 86(3), pages 419-426, March.
  12. Richard Easterlin, 1978. "What will 1984 be like? Socioeconomic implications of recent twists in age structure," Demography, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 397-432, November.
  13. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Jocelyn Finlay, 2008. "Population Aging and Economic Growth in Asia," PGDA Working Papers 4008, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  14. Gindling, T. H. & Robbins, Donald, 2001. "Patterns and Sources of Changing Wage Inequality in Chile and Costa Rica During Structural Adjustment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 725-745, April.
  15. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Günther Fink, 2011. "Implications of Population Aging for Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 16705, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1.
  18. Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
  19. Richard B. Freeman, 1979. "The Effect of Demographic Factors on Age-Earnings Profiles," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(3), pages 289-318.
  20. Joseph E. Potter & Carl P. Schmertmann & Renato M. Assunç�o & Suzana M. Cavenaghi, 2010. "Mapping the Timing, Pace, and Scale of the Fertility Transition in Brazil," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 283-307.
  21. Biagi, Federico & Lucifora, Claudio, 2008. "Demographic and education effects on unemployment in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 1076-1101, October.
  22. Naercio Menezes Filho & Naercio Menezes Filho, 2006. "Trade Liberalization and the Demand for Skilled Labor in Brazil," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION.
  23. Mark J. Roberts & Emmanuel Skoufias, 1997. "The Long-Run Demand for Skilled and Unskilled Labor in Colombian Manufacturing Plants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 330-334, May.
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