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The Decomposition of Economic Outcomes as a Result of Changes in Brazil’s Male Age–Education Structure

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  • Ernesto Lima Amaral

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Abstract

In Brazil, the age and education compositions of the male labor force is changing with great regional variation. Based on Demographic Census microdata, results indicate that cohort size has a negative impact on earnings, but this effect is decreasing over time. In this study we consider the impact on earnings by age and education, as well as estimated income inequality reduction and racial differentials. Fertility decline and improve regarding educational attainment had a significant influence on the decline of income inequality in the country. Moreover, the non-white population has been experiencing less success in relation to educational achievement, compared to the white population. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Ernesto Lima Amaral, 2012. "The Decomposition of Economic Outcomes as a Result of Changes in Brazil’s Male Age–Education Structure," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(6), pages 883-905, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:31:y:2012:i:6:p:883-905
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-012-9245-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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