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Benjamin Ho

Personal Details

First Name:Benjamin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ho
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pho634
http://irving.vassar.edu/faculty/bh/bh.htm
650-867-8270
Terminal Degree:2006 Graduate School of Business; Stanford University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
Vassar College

Poughkeepsie, New York (United States)
http://economics.vassar.edu/

(914)437-7395
(914)437-7576
Maildrop 708, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie NY 12604-0708
RePEc:edi:edvasus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Basil Halperin & Benjamin Ho & John A. List & Ian Muir, 2019. "Toward an Understanding of the Economics of Apologies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25676, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Benjamin Ho & Elaine Liu, 2013. "What's an Apology Worth? Difference-in-Differences Analysis of State Apology Laws on Medical Malpractice Payouts," Working Papers 201309853, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  3. Bento, Antonio M. & Ho, Benjamin & Poe, Gregory L. & Taber, John T., 2010. "Culpability and Willingness to Pay to Reduce Negative Externalities: A Contingent Valuation and Experimental Economics Study," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61868, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

Articles

  1. Qi Ge & Benjamin Ho, 2019. "Energy Use And Temperature Habituation: Evidence From High Frequency Thermostat Usage Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 1196-1214, April.
  2. Benjamin Ho & John Taber & Gregory Poe & Antonio Bento, 2016. "The Effects of Moral Licensing and Moral Cleansing in Contingent Valuation and Laboratory Experiments on the Demand to Reduce Externalities," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 64(2), pages 317-340, June.
  3. Bento, Antonio & Ho, Benjamin & Ramirez-Basora, Mario, 2015. "Optimal monitoring and offset prices in voluntary emissions markets," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 202-223.
  4. Ho, Benjamin & Liu, Peng, 2015. "Herd journalism: Investment in novelty and popularity in markets for news," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 33-46.
  5. Bao Jiayi & Ho Benjamin, 2015. "Heterogeneous Effects of Informational Nudges on Pro-social Behavior," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 1619-1655, October.
  6. Sita Nataraj Slavov & Benjamin Ho, 2014. "Measuring inequality: One size does not fit all," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, April.
  7. Benjamin Ho, 2012. "Apologies as Signals: With Evidence from a Trust Game," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(1), pages 141-158, January.
  8. Benjamin Ho & Sita N. Slavov, 2012. "An alternative perspective on health inequality," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3182-3196.
  9. Benjamin Ho & Elaine Liu, 2011. "Does sorry work? The impact of apology laws on medical malpractice," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 141-167, October.
  10. Heath, Chip & Ho, Ben & Berger, Jonah, 2006. "Focal points in coordinated divergence," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 635-647, October.

Chapters

  1. Benjamin Ho & David Huffman, 2018. "Trust and the law," Chapters, in: Joshua C. Teitelbaum & Kathryn Zeiler (ed.),Research Handbook on Behavioral Law and Economics, chapter 11, pages 294-318, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Basil Halperin & Benjamin Ho & John List & Ian Muir, 2018. "Toward an understanding of the economics of apologies: evidence from a large-scale natural field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00644, The Field Experiments Website.

    Mentioned in:

    1. How Should You Ask for Forgiveness? (NSQ Ep. 27)
      by Rebecca Lee Douglas in Freakonomics on 2020-11-15 10:00:22

Working papers

  1. Basil Halperin & Benjamin Ho & John A. List & Ian Muir, 2019. "Toward an Understanding of the Economics of Apologies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25676, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Moshe A. Barach & Joseph M. Golden & John J. Horton, 2020. "Steering in Online Markets: The Role of Platform Incentives and Credibility," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(9), pages 4047-4070, September.
    2. Bharat Chandar & Uri Gneezy & John List & Ian Muir, 2019. "The Drivers of Social Preferences: Evidence from a Nationwide Tipping Field Experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00680, The Field Experiments Website.
    3. Kyeong Sam Min & Jae Min Jung & Kisang Ryu & Curtis Haugtvedt & Sathiadev Mahesh & John Overton, 2020. "Timing of apology after service failure: the moderating role of future interaction expectation on customer satisfaction," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 217-230, September.
    4. Hill Cummings, Krista & Seitchik, Allison E., 2020. "The differential treatment of women during service recovery: How perceived social power affects consumers’ postfailure compensation," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 63(5), pages 647-658.
    5. Wang, Hai & Yang, Hai, 2019. "Ridesourcing systems: A framework and review," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 122-155.
    6. Moshe A. Barach & Joseph M. Golden & John J. Horton, 2019. "Steering in Online Markets: The Role of Platform Incentives and Credibility," NBER Working Papers 25917, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Bento, Antonio M. & Ho, Benjamin & Poe, Gregory L. & Taber, John T., 2010. "Culpability and Willingness to Pay to Reduce Negative Externalities: A Contingent Valuation and Experimental Economics Study," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61868, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Akcura, Elcin, 2015. "Mandatory versus voluntary payment for green electricity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 84-94.

Articles

  1. Qi Ge & Benjamin Ho, 2019. "Energy Use And Temperature Habituation: Evidence From High Frequency Thermostat Usage Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 1196-1214, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Qi Ge & Brad Humphreys & Kun Zhou, 2017. "Are Fair Weather Fans Affected by Weather? Rainfall, Habit Formation and Live Game Attendance," Working Papers 17-24, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

  2. Benjamin Ho & John Taber & Gregory Poe & Antonio Bento, 2016. "The Effects of Moral Licensing and Moral Cleansing in Contingent Valuation and Laboratory Experiments on the Demand to Reduce Externalities," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 64(2), pages 317-340, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Cherry, Todd L. & McEvoy, David M. & Westskog, Hege, 2019. "Cultural worldviews, institutional rules and the willingness to participate in green energy programs," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 28-38.
    2. Serhiy Kandul & Bruno Lanz, 2018. "When within- and outgroup norms conflict: A public good experiment with strategic ignorance of social norms," IRENE Working Papers 18-06, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Dütschke, Elisabeth & Frondel, Manuel & Schleich, Joachim & Vance, Colin, 2018. "Moral licensing: Another source of rebound?," Ruhr Economic Papers 747, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Thunström, Linda & Gilbert, Ben & Ritten, Chian Jones, 2018. "Nudges that hurt those already hurting – distributional and unintended effects of salience nudges," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 267-282.

  3. Bento, Antonio & Ho, Benjamin & Ramirez-Basora, Mario, 2015. "Optimal monitoring and offset prices in voluntary emissions markets," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 202-223.

    Cited by:

    1. Koch, Nicolas & Reuter, Wolf Heinrich & Fuss, Sabine & Grosjean, Godefroy, 2017. "Permits vs. offsets under investment uncertainty," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 33-47.

  4. Ho, Benjamin & Liu, Peng, 2015. "Herd journalism: Investment in novelty and popularity in markets for news," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 33-46.

    Cited by:

    1. Marco Le Moglie & Gilberto Turati, 2018. "Electoral Cycle Bias in the Media Coverage of Corruption News," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def069, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    2. George, Lisa M., 2016. "Mobile, Media & More: Contributions and Developments at Information Economics and Policy," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-2.

  5. Bao Jiayi & Ho Benjamin, 2015. "Heterogeneous Effects of Informational Nudges on Pro-social Behavior," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 1619-1655, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Isoaho, K. & Burgas, D. & Janasik, N. & Mönkkönen, M. & Peura, M. & Hukkinen, J.I., 2019. "Changing forest stakeholders’ perception of ecosystem services with linguistic nudging," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).

  6. Benjamin Ho, 2012. "Apologies as Signals: With Evidence from a Trust Game," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(1), pages 141-158, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Schniter & Roman M. Sheremeta, 2014. "Predictable and Predictive Emotions: Explaining Cheap Signals and Trust Re-Extension," Working Papers 14-07, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    2. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2016. "The Sorry Clause," Other publications TiSEM 9340f3b1-ebf3-46b9-8ffd-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Diego Gambetta & Wojtek Przepiorka, 2014. "Natural and Strategic Generosity as Signals of Trustworthiness," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 9(5), pages 1-9, May.
    4. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2017. "The Sorry Clause (revision of CentER DP 2016-008)," Discussion Paper 2017-002, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Fischbacher, Urs & Utikal, Verena, 2013. "On the acceptance of apologies," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 592-608.
    6. Basil Halperin & Benjamin Ho & John A. List & Ian Muir, 2019. "Toward an Understanding of the Economics of Apologies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25676, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2017. "The Sorry Clause (Revision of TILEC DP 2016-004)," Discussion Paper 2017-002, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.
    8. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2016. "The Sorry Clause," Discussion Paper 2016-008, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    9. Verena Utikal, 2013. "I am sorry - Honest and Fake Apologies," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-18, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    10. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2016. "The Sorry Clause," Other publications TiSEM 51d65f16-812c-4fbd-9cd2-f, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    11. Marie Racine & Craig Wilson & Michael Wynes, 2020. "The Value of Apology: How do Corporate Apologies Moderate the Stock Market Reaction to Non-Financial Corporate Crises?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 163(3), pages 485-505, May.
    12. Cailin O'Connor, 2019. "Methods, Models, and the Evolution of Moral Psychology," Papers 1909.09198, arXiv.org.
    13. Ben Gilbert & Alexander James & Jason Shogren, 2017. "Corporate Apology for Environmental Damage," Working Papers 2017-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    14. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2017. "The Sorry Clause (Revision of TILEC DP 2016-004)," Other publications TiSEM 5925920e-05c6-4ae0-8e76-d, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    15. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2017. "The Sorry Clause (revision of CentER DP 2016-008)," Other publications TiSEM 252e9410-4c9f-4a40-9ab7-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    16. Srivastava, Vatsalya, 2016. "The Sorry Clause," Discussion Paper 2016-004, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.

  7. Benjamin Ho & Elaine Liu, 2011. "Does sorry work? The impact of apology laws on medical malpractice," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 141-167, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Ho, 2012. "Apologies as Signals: With Evidence from a Trust Game," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(1), pages 141-158, January.
    2. Basil Halperin & Benjamin Ho & John A. List & Ian Muir, 2019. "Toward an Understanding of the Economics of Apologies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25676, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Verena Utikal, 2013. "I am sorry - Honest and Fake Apologies," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-18, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    4. Ben Gilbert & Alexander James & Jason Shogren, 2017. "Corporate Apology for Environmental Damage," Working Papers 2017-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    5. Elias L Khalil & Nick Feltovich, 2018. "Moral licensing, instrumental apology and insincerity aversion: Taking Immanuel Kant to the lab," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(11), pages 1-24, November.

  8. Heath, Chip & Ho, Ben & Berger, Jonah, 2006. "Focal points in coordinated divergence," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 635-647, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Bucci, Gabriella A. & Tenorio, Rafael, 2010. "Group diversity and salience: A natural experiment from a television game show," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 306-315, April.
    2. Ho, Benjamin & Liu, Peng, 2015. "Herd journalism: Investment in novelty and popularity in markets for news," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 33-46.
    3. Koumakhov, Rouslan, 2009. "Conventions in Herbert Simon's theory of bounded rationality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 293-306, June.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (2) 2018-09-17 2019-04-01
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2013-04-20

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