IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pbo869.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Jamie Bologna

Personal Details

First Name:Jamie
Middle Name:
Last Name:Bologna
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbo869
http://jamielbologna.com

Affiliation

Department of Economics
College of Business and Economics
West Virginia University

Morgantown, West Virginia (United States)
http://www.be.wvu.edu/econ/

: (304) 293-7859
(304) 293-2233
P.O. Box 6025, Morgantown, WV 26506-6025
RePEc:edi:dewvuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from a Random Audit Program," Working Papers 15-05, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  2. Jamie Bologna, 2014. "The Effect of Informal Employment and Corruption on Income Levels in Brazil," Working Papers 14-26, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  3. Jamie Bologna, 2014. "Is the Internet an Effective Mechanism for Reducing Corruption Experience? Evidence from a Cross-Section of Countries," Working Papers 14-04, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  4. Jamie Bologna & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Crises and Government: Some Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 14-36, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  5. Jamie Bologna & Joshua C. Hall, 2014. "Economic Freedom Research: Some Comments and Suggestions," Working Papers 14-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  6. Jamie Bologna & Donald J. Lacombe & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "A Spatial Analysis of Incomes and Institutional Quality : Evidence from US Metropolitan Areas," Working Papers 14-11, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

Articles

  1. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and entrepreneurship: evidence from Brazilian municipalities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 59-77, October.
  2. Jamie Bologna, 2014. "Is the Internet an effective mechanism for reducing corruption experience? Evidence from a cross-section of countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(10), pages 687-691, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from a Random Audit Program," Working Papers 15-05, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    Cited by:

    1. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha M. King, 2017. "Does emigration reduce corruption?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 171(3), pages 389-408, June.
    2. Boudreaux, Christopher, 2019. "Do private enterprises outperform state enterprises in an emerging market? The importance of institutional context in entrepreneurship," MPRA Paper 93039, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Maksim Belitski & Farzana Chowdhury & Sameeksha Desai, 2016. "Taxes, corruption, and entry," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 201-216, June.
    4. Christopher J. Boudreaux & Boris N. Nikolaev & Randall G. Holcombe, 2018. "Corruption and destructive entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 181-202, June.

  2. Jamie Bologna, 2014. "The Effect of Informal Employment and Corruption on Income Levels in Brazil," Working Papers 14-26, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Hall & John Levendis, 2017. "The Efficient Corruption Hypothesis and the Dynamics between Economic Freedom, Corruption, and National Income," Working Papers 17-06, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from a Random Audit Program," Working Papers 15-05, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. Jamie Bologna, 2017. "Contagious corruption, informal employment, and income: evidence from Brazilian municipalities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 58(1), pages 67-118, January.
    4. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and entrepreneurship: evidence from Brazilian municipalities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 59-77, October.
    5. Pavlik, Jamie Bologna & Williams, Ryan Blake, 2018. "Is the Devil in the Shadow? A Reexamination of the Relationship between Institutions and Income," 2018 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2018, Jacksonville, Florida 266675, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

  3. Jamie Bologna & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Crises and Government: Some Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 14-36, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    Cited by:

    1. Bjørnskov, Christian & Rode, Martin, 2016. "And Yet It Grows: Crisis, Ideology, and Interventionist Policy Ratchets," Working Paper Series 1135, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Andersson, Fredrik NG, 2016. "A Blessing in Disguise? Banking Crises and Institutional Change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 135-147.
    3. Bjørnskov, Christian, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Economic Crisis," Working Paper Series 1056, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    4. Benjamin Powell & Matt E. Ryan, 2017. "The Global Spread of Think Tanks and Economic Freedom," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Fall 2017), pages 17-31.
    5. Jamie Bologna & Joshua C. Hall, 2014. "Economic Freedom Research: Some Comments and Suggestions," Working Papers 14-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    6. Ryan H. Murphy, 2019. "The long‐run effect of government ideology on economic freedom," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 101-114, February.
    7. Ryan H. Murphy & Taylor Leland Smith, 2018. "Aggregate demand shortfalls and economic freedom," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 111-122, March.
    8. Keith Barnatchez & Robert Lester, 2017. "The Relationship Between Economic Freedom And Economic Dynamism," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 358-372, April.
    9. Powell, Benjamin & Clark, J.R. & Nowrasteh, Alex, 2017. "Does mass immigration destroy institutions? 1990s Israel as a natural experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 83-95.

  4. Jamie Bologna & Joshua C. Hall, 2014. "Economic Freedom Research: Some Comments and Suggestions," Working Papers 14-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Hall & John Levendis, 2017. "The Efficient Corruption Hypothesis and the Dynamics between Economic Freedom, Corruption, and National Income," Working Papers 17-06, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Scott Beaulier & Robert Elder & Cheryl Han & Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "An ordinal ranking of economic institutions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(26), pages 2482-2490, June.
    3. Joshua C. Hall, 2017. "A "Model" Model: McCloskey and the Craft of Economics," Working Papers 17-09, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Pál Czeglédi, 2015. "Are both dimensions of property rights "efficient"?," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 12(1), pages 41-69, July.
    5. Judit Kapás & Pál Czeglédi, 2017. "Institutions and policies of economic freedom: different effects on income and growth," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(2), pages 259-282, August.

  5. Jamie Bologna & Donald J. Lacombe & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "A Spatial Analysis of Incomes and Institutional Quality : Evidence from US Metropolitan Areas," Working Papers 14-11, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    Cited by:

    1. Jamie Bologna & Joshua C. Hall, 2014. "Economic Freedom Research: Some Comments and Suggestions," Working Papers 14-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Joshua C. Hall & Donald J. Lacombe & Timothy M. Shaughnessy, 2019. "Economic Freedom And Income Levels Across U.S. States: A Spatial Panel Data Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 40-49, January.
    3. Jamie Bologna, 2017. "Contagious corruption, informal employment, and income: evidence from Brazilian municipalities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 58(1), pages 67-118, January.
    4. Trey Malone & Jayson L. Lusk, 2016. "Brewing up entrepreneurship: government intervention in beer," Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 325-342, November.
    5. Wiseman, Travis, 2016. "U.S. Shadow Economies, Corruption, and Entrepreneurship: State-level Spatial Relations," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 46(2), December.
    6. Joshua C. Hall & Donald J. Lacombe & Shree B. Pokharel, 2016. "Freedom and entrepreneurship: a spatial econometric approach," Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 404-411, November.

Articles

  1. Jamie Bologna & Amanda Ross, 2015. "Corruption and entrepreneurship: evidence from Brazilian municipalities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 59-77, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha M. King, 2017. "Does emigration reduce corruption?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 171(3), pages 389-408, June.
    2. Boudreaux, Christopher, 2019. "Do private enterprises outperform state enterprises in an emerging market? The importance of institutional context in entrepreneurship," MPRA Paper 93039, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Christopher J. Boudreaux & Boris N. Nikolaev & Randall G. Holcombe, 2018. "Corruption and destructive entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 181-202, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (1) 2015-06-05
  2. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2015-01-19
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2014-10-03
  4. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2015-06-05
  5. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2014-07-13
  6. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2014-07-13
  7. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2014-10-03
  8. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (1) 2014-07-13
  9. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (1) 2014-10-03
  10. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2014-10-03
  11. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2015-01-19
  12. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2014-10-03
  13. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2014-07-13

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Jamie Bologna should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.