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Daniel Jacob Benjamin

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Personal Details

First Name:Daniel
Middle Name:Jacob
Last Name:Benjamin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbe959
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://static.usc.edu/people/staff/djbenjam
Los Angeles, California (United States)
http://cesr.usc.edu/

:

12015 Waterfront Drive, Playa Vista, CA 90094
RePEc:edi:dcuscus (more details at EDIRC)
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  1. Jonathan P. Beauchamp & Daniel J. Benjamin & Christopher F. Chabris & David I. Laibson, 2015. "Controlling for the Compromise Effect Debiases Estimates of Risk Preference Parameters," NBER Working Papers 21792, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Collin Raymond & Daniel J. Benjamin & Matthew Rabin, 2013. "A Model of Non-Belief in the Law of Large Numbers," Economics Series Working Papers 672, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Lee, James & Borst, Gregoire & Chabris, Christopher F. & Benjamin, Daniel J. & Beauchamp, Jonathan P. & Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Pinker, Steven & Laibson, David I., 2013. "Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated With Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations," Scholarly Articles 12410512, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Meike Bartels & Daniel J. Benjamin & David Cesarini & Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Magnus Johannesson & Philipp D. Koellinger & Robert F. Krueger & Patrik K. E. Magnusson & Nancy L. Pedersen & Cornelius A. , 2013. "Molecular Genetics and Subjective Well-Being," CEP Discussion Papers dp1225, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Hastie, Nicholas D. & van der Loos, Matthijs J. H. M. & Vitart, Veronique & Völzke, Henry & Wellmann, Jürgen & Yu, Lei & Zhao, Wei & Allik, Jüri & Attia, John R. & Bandinelli, Stefania & Bastardot,, 2013. "GWAS of 126,559 Individuals Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Educational Attainment," Scholarly Articles 13383543, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2013. "Can Marginal Rates of Substitution Be Inferred from Happiness Data? Evidence from Residency Choices," NBER Working Papers 18927, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Nichole Szembrot, 2013. "Aggregating Local Preferences to Guide Marginal Policy Adjustments," NBER Working Papers 18787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Grankvist, Alexander & Benjamin, Daniel J. & Harris, Tamara B. & Launer, Lenore J. & Smith, Albert Vernon & Johannesson, Magnus & Atwood, Craig S. & Hebert, Benjamin Michael & Hultman, Christina M. & , 2012. "The Promises and Pitfalls of Genoeconomics," Scholarly Articles 10137000, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. van der Loos, Matthijs J. H. M. & Benjamin, Daniel J. & Cesarini, David & Dawes, Christopher T. & Koellinger, Philipp D. & Magnusson, Patrik K. E. & Chabris, Christopher F. & Conley, Dalton & Laibson,, 2012. "The Genetic Architecture of Economic and Political Preferences," Scholarly Articles 10121961, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Nichole Szembrot, 2012. "Beyond Happiness and Satisfaction: Toward Well-Being Indices Based on Stated Preference," NBER Working Papers 18374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Beauchamp, Jonathan P. & Christakis, Nicholas Alexander & Hauser, Robert M. & Laibson, David I. & Benjamin, Daniel J. & Johannesson, Magnus & Atwood, Craig S. & Freese, Jeremy & Hauser, Taissa S. & Ch, 2012. "Most Reported Genetic Associations with General Intelligence Are Probably False Positives," Scholarly Articles 9938142, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2010. "Do People Seek to Maximize Happiness? Evidence from New Surveys," NBER Working Papers 16489, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & Geoffrey W. Fisher, 2010. "Religious Identity and Economic Behavior," NBER Working Papers 15925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Daniel Benjamin & James Choi & A. Strickland, 2008. "Social Identity and Preferences," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2634, Yale School of Management.
  15. Daniel J. Benjamin & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "Thin-Slice Forecasts of Gubernatorial Elections," NBER Working Papers 12660, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Daniel J. Benjamin & Sebastian A. Brown & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "Who is “Behavioral”? Cognitive Ability and Anomalous Preferences," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000001334, David K. Levine.
  1. Daniel J. Benjamin & Matthew Rabin & Collin Raymond, 2016. "A Model Of Nonbelief In The Law Of Large Numbers," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 515-544, 04.
  2. Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & Geoffrey Fisher, 2016. "Religious Identity and Economic Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(4), pages 617-637, October.
  3. Daniel J. Benjamin, 2015. "A Theory of Fairness in Labour Markets," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 182-225, 06.
  4. Daniel J. Benjamin, 2015. "Distributional Preferences, Reciprocity-Like Behavior, and Efficiency in Bilateral Exchange," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 70-98, February.
  5. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Nichole Szembrot, 2014. "Beyond Happiness and Satisfaction: Toward Well-Being Indices Based on Stated Preference," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(9), pages 2698-2735, September.
  6. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2014. "Can Marginal Rates of Substitution Be Inferred from Happiness Data? Evidence from Residency Choices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(11), pages 3498-3528, November.
  7. Daniel J. Benjamin & Sebastian A. Brown & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2013. "Who Is ‘Behavioral’? Cognitive Ability And Anomalous Preferences," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 11(6), pages 1231-1255, December.
  8. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Nichole Szembrot, 2013. "Aggregating Local Preferences to Guide Marginal Policy Adjustments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 605-610, May.
  9. Daniel J. Benjamin & David Cesarini & Christopher F. Chabris & Edward L. Glaeser & David I. Laibson & Vilmundur Guðnason & Tamara B. Harris & Lenore J. Launer & Shaun Purcell & Albert Vernon Smith & M, 2012. "The Promises and Pitfalls of Genoeconomics," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 627-662, 07.
    • Grankvist, Alexander & Benjamin, Daniel J. & Harris, Tamara B. & Launer, Lenore J. & Smith, Albert Vernon & Johannesson, Magnus & Atwood, Craig S. & Hebert, Benjamin Michael & Hultman, Christina M. & , 2012. "The Promises and Pitfalls of Genoeconomics," Scholarly Articles 10137000, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2012. "What Do You Think Would Make You Happier? What Do You Think You Would Choose?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2083-2110, August.
  11. Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & A. Joshua Strickland, 2010. "Social Identity and Preferences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1913-1928, September.
  12. Daniel J. Benjamin & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2009. "Thin-Slice Forecasts of Gubernatorial Elections," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(3), pages 523-536, August.
  13. Benjamin, Daniel J., 2003. "Does 401(k) eligibility increase saving?: Evidence from propensity score subclassification," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 1259-1290, May.
  14. Daniel J. Benjamin & David I. Laibson, 2003. "Good policies for bad governments: behavioral political economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 48(Jun).
NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (4) 2006-05-06 2007-08-14 2013-11-02 2014-07-28. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (3) 2006-05-06 2006-11-18 2007-08-14. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (3) 2010-10-30 2012-09-22 2013-07-05. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2006-05-06 2013-11-02
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2006-11-18 2007-08-14
  6. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (2) 2013-04-06 2015-12-28
  7. NEP-FMK: Financial Markets (1) 2006-05-06
  8. NEP-FOR: Forecasting (1) 2006-11-18
  9. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2007-08-14
  10. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2013-11-02
  11. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2013-04-06
  12. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2006-11-18
  13. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2007-08-14
  14. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2007-08-14
This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Simple Impact Factor
  2. Number of Distinct Works, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor
  3. Number of Citations, Weighted by Simple Impact Factor, Discounted by Citation Age
  4. Number of Citations, Weighted by Recursive Impact Factor, Discounted by Citation Age

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