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Sarah H. Bana

Personal Details

First Name:Sarah
Middle Name:H.
Last Name:Bana
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1677
http://www.sarahbana.com

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bana, Sarah & Bedard, Kelly & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2018. "The Impacts of Paid Family Leave Benefits: Regression Kink Evidence from California Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11381, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater & Jenna Stearns, 2018. "Unequal Use of Social Insurance Benefits: The Role of Employers," NBER Working Papers 25163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater, 2018. "Trends and Disparities in Leave Use under California's Paid Family Leave Program: New Evidence from Administrative Data," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 108, pages 388-391, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bana, Sarah & Bedard, Kelly & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2018. "The Impacts of Paid Family Leave Benefits: Regression Kink Evidence from California Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11381, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater & Jenna Stearns, 2018. "Unequal Use of Social Insurance Benefits: The Role of Employers," NBER Working Papers 25163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2018. "Parental leave benefits, household labor supply, and children's long-run outcomes," IFS Working Papers W18/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Samantha Trajkovski, 2019. "California Paid Family Leave and Parental Time Use," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 217, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    4. Martha J. Bailey & Tanya S. Byker & Elena Patel & Shanthi Ramnath, 2019. "The Long-Term Effects of California’s 2004 Paid Family Leave Act on Women’s Careers: Evidence from U.S. Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 26416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bullinger, Lindsey Rose, 2019. "The Effect of Paid Family Leave on Infant and Parental Health in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 101-116.

  2. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater & Jenna Stearns, 2018. "Unequal Use of Social Insurance Benefits: The Role of Employers," NBER Working Papers 25163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Brenøe, Anne Ardila & Canaan, Serena & Harmon, Nikolaj & Royer, Heather, 2019. "Is Parental Leave Costly for Firms and Coworkers?," IZA Discussion Papers 12870, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Marta Lachowska & Alexandre Mas & Raffaele D. Saggio & Stephen A. Woodbury, 2020. "Do Firm Effects Drift? Evidence from Washington Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 26653, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater, 2018. "Trends and Disparities in Leave Use under California's Paid Family Leave Program: New Evidence from Administrative Data," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 108, pages 388-391, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Bana & Kelly Bedard & Maya Rossin-Slater & Jenna Stearns, 2018. "Unequal Use of Social Insurance Benefits: The Role of Employers," NBER Working Papers 25163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Petra Persson & Maya Rossin-Slater, 2019. "When Dad Can Stay Home: Fathers' Workplace Flexibility and Maternal Health," NBER Working Papers 25902, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bana, Sarah & Bedard, Kelly & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2018. "The Impacts of Paid Family Leave Benefits: Regression Kink Evidence from California Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11381, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2018-11-12 2018-11-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (2) 2018-11-12 2018-11-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2018-04-23. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2018-04-23. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2018-04-30. Author is listed
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2018-11-12. Author is listed
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2018-11-12. Author is listed

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