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Stefan Erik Oppers

Personal Details

First Name:Stefan
Middle Name:Erik
Last Name:Oppers
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pop2
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:1993 Department of Economics; Harvard University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.imf.org/
RePEc:edi:imfffus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mr. S. E Oppers, 2002. "The Austrian Theory of Business Cycles: Old Lessons for Modern Economic Policy?," IMF Working Papers 2002/002, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Oppers, S.E., 1994. "Was the Worldwide Shift to Gold Inevitable? An Analysis of the End pf Bimetalism," Working Papers 351, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  3. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "Arbitrage in Bimetallic Money Supplies: Evidence from the Exchange Rate," Working Papers 338, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  4. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "A Model of the Bimetallic System," Working Papers 332, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  5. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in Eitheenth- Century Britain," Working Papers 329, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

Articles

  1. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 2000. "A model of the bimetallic system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 517-533, October.
  2. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 1996. "Was the worldwide shift to gold inevitable? An analysis of the end of bimetallism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 143-162, February.
  3. Oppers, Stefan E., 1993. "The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in Eighteenth-Century Britain," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 25-43, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Author Profile
    1. Opper S. (1993): the incredible story of the fleeing Dutchmen
      by Ben in Economic History Blog on 2010-12-13 19:34:00

Working papers

  1. Mr. S. E Oppers, 2002. "The Austrian Theory of Business Cycles: Old Lessons for Modern Economic Policy?," IMF Working Papers 2002/002, International Monetary Fund.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter G. Klein, 2010. "F.A. Hayek," Chapters, in: Peter G. Klein & Michael E. Sykuta (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Transaction Cost Economics, chapter 8, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Andreas Hoffmann, 2014. "Zero-interest Rate Policy and Unintended Consequences in Emerging Markets," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(10), pages 1367-1387, October.
    3. Enrico Colombatto, 2004. "Sulle dinamiche del ciclo misesiano," ICER Working Papers 04-2004, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    4. van Riet Ad, 2019. "Twenty Years of European Central Bank Monetary Policy: A Keynesian and Austrian Perspective," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 239(5-6), pages 797-840, October.
    5. Nicolas Cachanosky, 2014. "The Mises-Hayek business cycle theory, fiat currencies and open economies," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 281-299, September.
    6. Hoffmann, Andreas, 2009. "An Overinvestment Cycle in Central and Eastern Europe?," MPRA Paper 15668, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Escañuela Romana, Ignacio, 2016. "Randomness, Determinism and Undecidability in the Economic cycle Theory," MPRA Paper 74646, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Jean-Marc Natal, 2004. "Deflation and Deflationary Traps: The Situation in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 140(I), pages 127-170, March.
    9. Robert H. Dugger & Angel Ubide, 2004. "Structural Traps, Politics and Monetary Policy," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 85-116, March.
    10. Escañuela Romana, Ignacio, 2016. "Azar, Determinismo e Indecidibilidad en la Teoría del Ciclo Económico [Randomness, Determinism and Undecidability in the Business Cycle Theory]," MPRA Paper 72978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Nicolás Cachanosky & Alexander W. Salter, 2017. "The view from Vienna: An analysis of the renewed interest in the Mises-Hayek theory of the business cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 169-192, June.
    12. Kavaliou, Aliaksandr (Ковалев, Александр), 2015. "Austrian Business Cycle Theory: An Evolution and Contemporary Condition [Теория Экономического Цикла Австрийской Школы: Эволюция И Современное Состояние]," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 2, pages 43-62.

  2. Oppers, S.E., 1994. "Was the Worldwide Shift to Gold Inevitable? An Analysis of the End pf Bimetalism," Working Papers 351, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher M. Meissner, 2015. "The Limits of Bimetallism," NBER Working Papers 20852, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Matthias Morys, 2012. "The emergence of the Classical Gold Standard," Centre for Historical Economics and Related Research at York (CHERRY) Discussion Papers 12/01, CHERRY, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Francois R. Velde & Warren E. Weber, 2000. "A Model of Bimetallism," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1210-1234, December.
    4. Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2013. "Competing Bimetallic Ratios: Amsterdam, London and Bullion Arbitrage in the Mid-18th Century," CEPR Discussion Papers 9300, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Ricardo T. Fernholz & Kris James Mitchener & Marc Weidenmier, 2017. "Pulling up the Tarnished Anchor: The End of Silver as a Global Unit of Account," CESifo Working Paper Series 6436, CESifo.
    6. Bordo, Michael D. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2009. "Identifying the effects of an exchange rate depreciation on country risk: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1022-1044, October.
    7. E.J. Weber, 1999. "A History of Bimetallism: Greece, Rome, Middle Ages, Modern Times," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 99-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    8. Matthias Morys, 2007. "The emergence of the Classical Gold Standard," Working Papers 7010, Economic History Society.
    9. Ljungberg, Jonas & Ögren, Anders, 2019. "Discipline or external balance? The choice of international monetary systems in Europe," Lund Papers in Economic History 190, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    10. Larry Neal & Marc Weidenmier, 2002. "Crises in the Global Economy from Tulips to Today: Contagion and Consequences," NBER Working Papers 9147, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Esteves, Rui & Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2019. "Monetary Systems and the Global Balance-of-Payments Adjustment in the Pre-Gold Standard Period, 1700-1870," CEPR Discussion Papers 13652, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "Arbitrage in Bimetallic Money Supplies: Evidence from the Exchange Rate," Working Papers 338, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

    Cited by:

    1. Flandreau, Marc R, 2002. ""Water Seeks a Level": Modeling Bimetallic Exchange Rates and the Bimetallic Band," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 491-519, May.

  4. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "A Model of the Bimetallic System," Working Papers 332, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher M. Meissner, 2015. "The Limits of Bimetallism," NBER Working Papers 20852, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Flandreau, Marc R, 2002. ""Water Seeks a Level": Modeling Bimetallic Exchange Rates and the Bimetallic Band," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 491-519, May.
    3. Francois R. Velde & Warren E. Weber, 2000. "A Model of Bimetallism," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1210-1234, December.
    4. Matthias Morys, 2007. "The emergence of the Classical Gold Standard," Working Papers 7010, Economic History Society.
    5. Flandreau, Marc & Oosterlinck, Kim, 2012. "Was the emergence of the international gold standard expected? Evidence from Indian Government securities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(7), pages 649-669.
    6. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 1996. "Was the worldwide shift to gold inevitable? An analysis of the end of bimetallism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 143-162, February.
    7. Diebolt, Claude & Parent, Antoine, 2008. "Bimetallism: The "rules of the game"," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 288-302, July.

  5. Oppers, S.E., 1993. "The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in Eitheenth- Century Britain," Working Papers 329, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

    Cited by:

    1. Flandreau, Marc & Sussman, Nathan, 2004. "Old Sins: Exchange Rate Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," CEPR Discussion Papers 4248, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Marc Flandreau & Nathan Sussman, 2004. "Old sins. Exchange Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," Sciences Po publications n°4248, Sciences Po.
    3. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Working Papers 8846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. van de Klundert, Theo & Smulders, Sjak, 2001. "Loss of technological leadership of rentier economies: a two-country endogenous growth model," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 211-231, June.

Articles

  1. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 2000. "A model of the bimetallic system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 517-533, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 1996. "Was the worldwide shift to gold inevitable? An analysis of the end of bimetallism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 143-162, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Oppers, Stefan E., 1993. "The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in Eighteenth-Century Britain," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 25-43, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

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