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Understanding the inflation-output nexus for China

  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar
  • Narayan, Seema
  • Smyth, Russell

In this article we examine several hypotheses relating to output and inflation dynamics in China. The hypotheses tests are based on the exponential generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (EGARCH) model of Nelson [Nelson, D. (1991). Conditional heteroskedasticity in asset return: A new approach, Econometrica, 59, 347-370]. Our findings suggest that Chinese output-inflation behaviour is consistent with the hypothesis that increased inflation uncertainty lowers average inflation; the hypothesis that inflation volatility reduces economic growth and the hypothesis that higher output volatility increases economic growth. However, we find no support for the hypothesis that higher output volatility increases the average inflation rate.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 82-90

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:20:y:2009:i:1:p:82-90
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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