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Inflation, inflation uncertainty and growth in the Iranian economy: an application of BGARCH-M model with BEKK approach

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  • Hassan Heidari
  • Salih Turan Katircioglu
  • Sahar Bashiri

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between inflation, economic growth and their respective uncertainties in Iran for the period of 1988-2008 by using quarterly data. We employ a Bivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity-in-Mean (BGARCH-M) model to examine in a unified empirical framework all the possible interactions between inflation uncertainty and growth in Iran. The model is simultaneously estimated by using the maximum log-likelihood method with the BEKK approach. The main findings of the present study are: (1) Inflation causes inflation uncertainty, supporting the Friedman-Ball hypothesis. (2) Inflation uncertainty affects the level of economic growth, supporting the Friedman (1977) hypothesis. (3) Growth uncertainty does not affect the level of economic growth, supporting the Friedman (1968) hypothesis. (4) And finally our empirical evidence shows that growth uncertainty affects the level of inflation, supporting the Deveraux (1989) hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Hassan Heidari & Salih Turan Katircioglu & Sahar Bashiri, 2013. "Inflation, inflation uncertainty and growth in the Iranian economy: an application of BGARCH-M model with BEKK approach," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 819-832, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jbemgt:v:14:y:2013:i:5:p:819-832
    DOI: 10.3846/16111699.2012.670134
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Said Zamin Shah & Said Zamin Shah & Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Muzafar Shah Habibullah & Law Siong Hook, 2017. "The Asymmetric Effects of Real and Nominal Uncertainty on Inflation and Output Growth: Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 377-386.
    2. Bernard Njindan Iyke & Sin-Yu Ho, 2019. "Inflation, Inflation Uncertainty, and Growth: Evidence from Ghana," Contemporary Economics, University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw., vol. 13(2), June.
    3. Afsin Sahin & Volkan Ulke, 2015. "Farkli Belirsizlik Duzeylerinde Faiz Oraninin Makroekonomik Degiskenlere Etkileri : Turkiye Uzerine Etkilesimli Vektor Otoregresif Modeli Uygulamasi," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 15(1), pages 65-93.

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