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Official dollarization in El Salvador and the inflation-inflation uncertainty nexus


  • James Payne


This study extends the literature on the relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty by examining the impact of official dollarization on inflation uncertainty in El Salvador. The ARIMA-GARCH model reveals that official dollarization significantly reduces the degree of volatility persistence in response to inflationary shocks. However, based on Granger causality tests, if inflation should increase there would be an increase in inflation uncertainty as suggested by the Friedman-Ball hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • James Payne, 2009. "Official dollarization in El Salvador and the inflation-inflation uncertainty nexus," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(12), pages 1195-1199.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:16:y:2009:i:12:p:1195-1199 DOI: 10.1080/17446540802389065

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael L. Mussa & Paul A. Volcker & James Tobin, 1994. "Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters,in: American Economic Policy in the 1980s, pages 81-164 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    4. Fratantoni, Michael & Schuh, Scott, 2003. " Monetary Policy, Housing, and Heterogeneous Regional Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(4), pages 557-589, August.
    5. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1988. "Credit, Money, and Aggregate Demand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 435-439, May.
    6. Hoover, Kevin D. & Perez, Stephen J., 1994. "Post hoc ergo propter once more an evaluation of 'does monetary policy matter?' in the spirit of James Tobin," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 47-74, August.
    7. Gerald A. Carlino & Robert H. DeFina, 1997. "The differential regional effects of monetary policy: evidence from the U.S. States," Working Papers 97-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 01 Mar 1998.
    8. Gerald Carlino & Robert Defina, 1998. "The Differential Regional Effects Of Monetary Policy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 572-587, November.
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