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Inflation, inflation uncertainty, and a common European Monetary Policy


  • Stilianos Fountas
  • Alexandra Ioannidis
  • Menelaos Karanasos


The relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty is investigated in six European Union countries for the period 1960 to 1999. EGARCH models are used to generate a measure of inflation uncertainty and then Granger methods are employed to test for causality between average inflation and inflation uncertainty. In all the European countries, except Germany, inflation significantly raises inflation uncertainty as predicted by Friedman. However, in all countries except the UK, and possibly Italy, inflation uncertainty does not cause negative output effects implying that a common European monetary policy applied by the ECB might not lead to asymmetric real effects via the inflation uncertainty channel. Less robust evidence is found regarding the direction of the impact of a change in inflation uncertainty on inflation.In Germany, the Netherlands, and to a lesser extent Spain, increased inflation uncertainty lowers inflation while in the UK, Italy, and to a lesser extent France, increased inflation uncertainty raises inflation. These results are generally consistent with the existing rankings of Central Bank Independence.
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  • Stilianos Fountas & Alexandra Ioannidis & Menelaos Karanasos, 2004. "Inflation, inflation uncertainty, and a common European Monetary Policy," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2003 30, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:mmf:mmfc03:30

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nelson, Daniel B, 1991. "Conditional Heteroskedasticity in Asset Returns: A New Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(2), pages 347-370, March.
    2. Tim Bollerslev & Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 1988. "Quasi-Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Dynamic Models with Time-Varying Covariances," Working papers 505, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    3. Cukierman, Alex & Meltzer, Allan H, 1986. "A Theory of Ambiguity, Credibility, and Inflation under Discretion and Asymmetric Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1099-1128, September.
    4. Stilianos Fountas & Menelaos Karanasos & Marika Karanassou, "undated". "A GARCH Model of Inflation and Inflation Uncertainty with Simultaneous Feedback," Discussion Papers 00/24, Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Brunner, Allan D & Hess, Gregory D, 1993. "Are Higher Levels of Inflation Less Predictable? A State-Dependent Conditional Heteroscedasticity Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 11(2), pages 187-197, April.
    6. Friedman, Milton, 1977. "Nobel Lecture: Inflation and Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 451-472, June.
    7. Grier, Kevin B. & Perry, Mark J., 1998. "On inflation and inflation uncertainty in the G7 countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 671-689, August.
    8. Grier, Kevin B. & Tullock, Gordon, 1989. "An empirical analysis of cross-national economic growth, 1951-1980," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-276, September.
    9. Cosimano, Thomas F & Jansen, Dennis W, 1988. "Estimates of the Variance of U.S. Inflation Based upon the ARCH Model: A Comment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(3), pages 409-421, August.
    10. Kevin B. Grier & Mark J. Perry, 2000. "The effects of real and nominal uncertainty on inflation and output growth: some garch-m evidence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 45-58.
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    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies


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