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Evidence of a nonlinear relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty: The case of the four little dragons


  • Chen, Shyh-Wei
  • Shen, Chung-Hua
  • Xie, Zixiong


Using a nonlinear flexible regression model for four economies in east Asia, we re-examine two hypotheses in light of the causal relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty. The first, proposed by Friedman [Friedman, M. (1977). Nobel lecture: Inflation and unemployment. Journal of Political Economy, 85, 451-472], postulates that increased inflation raises inflation uncertainty. Conversely, the second, put forth by Cukierman and Meltzer [Cukierman, A., & Meltzer, A. (1986). a theory of ambiguity, credibility, and inflation under discretion and asymmetric information. Econometrica, 54, 1099-1128], propounds that a high level of inflation uncertainty leads to a higher rate of inflation. Here, except for Hong Kong, overwhelming statistical evidence is found in favor of Friedman's hypothesis. The nonlinearity displays a U-shaped pattern, strongly implying that, indeed, a high rate of inflation or deflation results in high inflation uncertainty. At the same time, however, convincing evidence is found for Cukierman-Meltzer's hypothesis in favor of all four economies. Although Taiwan has an inverted U-shape, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Korea show a positive relation, thus agreeing with Cukierman-Meltzer's hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Shyh-Wei & Shen, Chung-Hua & Xie, Zixiong, 2008. "Evidence of a nonlinear relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty: The case of the four little dragons," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 363-376.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:30:y:2008:i:2:p:363-376

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Claudiu T. Albulescu & Aviral Kumar Twari & Stephen M. Miller & Rangan Gupta, 2015. "Time-Frequency Relationship between Inflation and Inflation Uncertainty for the U.S.: Evidence from Historical Data," Working Papers 201591, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. WenShwo Fang & Stephen Miller & Chih-Chuan Yeh, 2010. "Does a threshold inflation rate exist? Quantile inferences for inflation and its variability," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 619-641, December.
    4. Neanidis, Kyriakos C. & Savva, Christos S., 2011. "Nominal uncertainty and inflation: The role of European Union membership," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 26-30, July.
    5. Dejan Živkov & Jovan Njegic & Marko Pecanac, 2014. "Bidirectional linkage between inflation and inflation uncertainty – the case of Eastern European countries," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 14(1-2), pages 124-139, December.
    6. Neanidis, Kyriakos C. & Savva, Christos S., 2013. "Macroeconomic uncertainty, inflation and growth: Regime-dependent effects in the G7," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 81-92.
    7. Nasr, Adnen Ben & Balcilar, Mehmet & Ajmi, Ahdi N. & Aye, Goodness C. & Gupta, Rangan & van Eyden, Reneé, 2015. "Causality between inflation and inflation uncertainty in South Africa: Evidence from a Markov-switching vector autoregressive model," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 46-68.
    8. Dong-Hyeon Kim & Shu-Chin Lin, 2012. "Inflation and Inflation Volatility Revisited," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 327-345, December.
    9. Hassan Heidari & Salih Turan Katircioglu & Sahar Bashiri, 2013. "Inflation, inflation uncertainty and growth in the Iranian economy: an application of BGARCH-M model with BEKK approach," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 819-832, November.
    10. Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Siew-Voon Soon, 2014. "Inflation, inflation uncertainty and output growth: what does the data say for Malaysia?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(3), pages 370-386, May.
    11. Kushal Banik Chowdhury & Nityananda Sarkar, 2015. "The Effect of Inflation on Inflation Uncertainty in the G7 Countries: A Double Threshold GARCH Model," International Econometric Review (IER), Econometric Research Association, vol. 7(1), pages 34-50, April.

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