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Was the Worldwide Shift to Gold Inevitable? An Analysis of the End pf Bimetalism

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  • Oppers, S.E.

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  • Oppers, S.E., 1994. "Was the Worldwide Shift to Gold Inevitable? An Analysis of the End pf Bimetalism," Working Papers 351, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:mie:wpaper:351
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Friedman, Milton, 1990. "The Crime of 1873," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(6), pages 1159-1194, December.
    2. Oppers, Stefan Erik, 2000. "A model of the bimetallic system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 517-533.
    3. repec:fth:michin:332 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kindleberger, Charles P., 1993. "A Financial History of Western Europe," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780195077384.
    5. Drake, Louis S., 1985. "Reconstruction of a bimetallic price level," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 194-219, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher M. Meissner, 2015. "The Limits of Bimetallism," NBER Working Papers 20852, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Matthias Morys, 2012. "The emergence of the Classical Gold Standard," Centre for Historical Economics and Related Research at York (CHERRY) Discussion Papers 12/01, CHERRY, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Larry Neal & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2001. "Crises in The Global Economy from Tulips to Today: Contagion and Consequences," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-32, Claremont Colleges.
    4. Francois R. Velde & Warren E. Weber, 2000. "A Model of Bimetallism," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1210-1234, December.
    5. Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2013. "Competing Bimetallic Ratios: Amsterdam, London, and Bullion Arbitrage in Mid-Eighteenth Century," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(02), pages 445-476, June.
    6. Fernholz, Ricardo T. & Mitchener, Kris James & Weidenmier, Marc, 2017. "Pulling up the tarnished anchor: The end of silver as a global unit of account," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 209-228.
    7. Bordo, Michael D. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2009. "Identifying the effects of an exchange rate depreciation on country risk: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1022-1044, October.
    8. E.J. Weber, 1999. "A History of Bimetallism: Greece, Rome, Middle Ages, Modern Times," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 99-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    gold ; money ; inflation;

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