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Tanya Byker

Personal Details

First Name:Tanya
Middle Name:
Last Name:Byker
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pby29
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/tanyabyker/
Terminal Degree:2014 Economics Department; University of Michigan (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Middlebury College

Middlebury, Vermont (United States)
http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/econ

(802) 443-5327
(802) 443-2185
Middlebury, VT 05753
RePEc:edi:demidus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Martha J. Bailey & Tanya S. Byker & Elena Patel & Shanthi Ramnath, 2019. "The Long-Term Effects of California’s 2004 Paid Family Leave Act on Women’s Careers: Evidence from U.S. Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 26416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Nicola Branson & Tanya Byker, 2016. "Causes and Consequences of Teen Childbearing: Evidence from a Reproductive Health Intervention in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 166, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  3. Tanya Byker & Italo A. Gutierrez, 2016. "Treatment Effects Using Inverse Probability Weighting and Contaminated Treatment Data An Application to the Evaluation of a Government Female Sterilization Campaign in Peru," Working Papers WR-1118-1, RAND Corporation.

Articles

  1. Branson, Nicola & Byker, Tanya, 2018. "Causes and consequences of teen childbearing: Evidence from a reproductive health intervention in South Africa," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 221-235.
  2. Julia Berazneva & Tanya S. Byker, 2017. "Does Forest Loss Increase Human Disease? Evidence from Nigeria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 516-521, May.
  3. Tanya S. Byker, 2016. "Paid Parental Leave Laws in the United States: Does Short-Duration Leave Affect Women's Labor-Force Attachment?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 242-246, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Martha J. Bailey & Tanya S. Byker & Elena Patel & Shanthi Ramnath, 2019. "The Long-Term Effects of California’s 2004 Paid Family Leave Act on Women’s Careers: Evidence from U.S. Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 26416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Elira Kuka & Na'ama Shenhav, 2020. "Long-Run Effects of Incentivizing Work After Childbirth," Working Papers 2020-10, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Benjamin Hansen & Drew McNichols, 2020. "Information and the Persistence of the Gender Wage Gap: Early Evidence from California's Salary History Ban," NBER Working Papers 27054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Nicola Branson & Tanya Byker, 2016. "Causes and Consequences of Teen Childbearing: Evidence from a Reproductive Health Intervention in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 166, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Catalina Herrera Almanza & David E. Sahn, 2018. "Early Childbearing, School Attainment, and Cognitive Skills: Evidence From Madagascar," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(2), pages 643-668, April.

Articles

  1. Branson, Nicola & Byker, Tanya, 2018. "Causes and consequences of teen childbearing: Evidence from a reproductive health intervention in South Africa," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 221-235.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Julia Berazneva & Tanya S. Byker, 2017. "Does Forest Loss Increase Human Disease? Evidence from Nigeria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 516-521, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Benjamin A. & McDermott, Shana M., 2018. "The economics of urban afforestation: Insights from an integrated bioeconomic-health model," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 116-135.
    2. Diana De Alwis & Ilan Noy, 2017. "The Cost of Being Under the Weather: Droughts, Floods, and Health Care Costs in Sri Lanka," CESifo Working Paper Series 6520, CESifo.
    3. Fergusson, L & Saavedra, S & Vargas, J. F, 2020. "The perils of misusing remote sensing data: The case of forest cover," Documentos de Trabajo 018153, Universidad del Rosario.
    4. Jones, Benjamin A. & Goodkind, Andrew L., 2019. "Urban afforestation and infant health: Evidence from MillionTreesNYC," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 26-44.
    5. Garg, Teevrat, 2019. "Ecosystems and Human Health: The Local Benefits of Forest Cover in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 12683, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Miller, Daniel C. & Hajjar, Reem, 2020. "Forests as pathways to prosperity: Empirical insights and conceptual advances," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 125(C).
    7. John Gibson, 2017. "Forest Loss and Economic Inequality in the Solomon Islands: Using Small-Area Estimation to Link Environmental Change to Welfare Outcomes," Working Papers in Economics 17/14, University of Waikato.
    8. Garg, Teevrat, 2019. "Ecosystems and human health: The local benefits of forest cover in Indonesia," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 98(C).
    9. Heidi J. Albers & Katherine D. Lee & Jennifer R. Rushlow & Carlos Zambrana-Torrselio, 2020. "Disease Risk from Human–Environment Interactions: Environment and Development Economics for Joint Conservation-Health Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 76(4), pages 929-944, August.
    10. Bauhoff, Sebastian & Busch, Jonah, 2020. "Does deforestation increase malaria prevalence? Evidence from satellite data and health surveys," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).

  3. Tanya S. Byker, 2016. "Paid Parental Leave Laws in the United States: Does Short-Duration Leave Affect Women's Labor-Force Attachment?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 242-246, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Bana, Sarah & Bedard, Kelly & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2018. "The Impacts of Paid Family Leave Benefits: Regression Kink Evidence from California Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11381, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Benjamin Bennett & Isil Erel & Léa H. Stern & Zexi Wang, 2020. "(Forced) Feminist Firms," NBER Working Papers 27788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jiyoon Kim, 2018. "The Timing Of Exemptions From Welfare Work Requirements And Its Effects On Mothers' Work And Welfare Receipt Around Childbirth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 317-342, January.
    4. Claudia Goldin & Sari Pekkala Kerr & Claudia Olivetti, 2020. "Why Firms Offer Paid Parental Leave: An Exploratory Study," NBER Working Papers 26617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Reed, Joshua & Vandegrift, Donald, 2016. "The Effect of New Jersey’s Paid Parental Leave Policy on Employment," MPRA Paper 74794, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Evans, Mary F. & Stafford, Sarah L., 2019. "The Clean Air Act Watch List and federal oversight of state enforcement efforts," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 170-184.
    7. Molly Mayer & Céline Le Bourdais, 2019. "Sharing Parental Leave Among Dual-Earner Couples in Canada: Does Reserved Paternity Leave Make a Difference?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(2), pages 215-239, April.
    8. Bilal Nabeel Falah & Marcelo Bérgolo & Arwa Abu Hashhash & Mohammad Hattawy & Iman Saadeh, 2019. "The Effect of Labor-Demand Shocks on Women’s Participation in the Labor Force: Evidence from Palestine," Working Papers PMMA 2019-08, PEP-PMMA.
    9. Bullinger, Lindsey Rose, 2019. "The Effect of Paid Family Leave on Infant and Parental Health in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 101-116.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2019-11-04. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2016-07-16. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2016-07-16. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2016-07-16. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2019-11-04. Author is listed

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