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A sequential model of older workers' labor force transitions after a health shock

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  • Sergi Jiménez‐Martín
  • José M. Labeaga
  • Cristina Vilaplana Prieto

Abstract

In this paper we estimate and validate a three‐period sequential model of older workers' labor force transitions following a health/disability shock, using retrospective information from Spanish cross‐section data. Central to the analysis are the effects of the various disabilities and their severity. We find that the probability of remaining employed decreases both with age and the severity of the shock. Moreover, we find strong interactions between age and severity for older workers and none for prime‐age workers. Suffering any kind of disability reduces the probability of being employed immediately prior to retirement age, and in such cases it is severity which is the strongest indicator. With respect to demographics, we find that female gender, having a retired spouse or being married all reduce the probabilities of both remaining in employment and returning to work following a spell of inactivity; in turn, principal breadwinner status, education and skill levels increase this likelihood. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergi Jiménez‐Martín & José M. Labeaga & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2006. "A sequential model of older workers' labor force transitions after a health shock," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 1033-1054, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:9:p:1033-1054
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alfonso Sánchez-Martin & J. García-Pérez & Sergi Jiménez-Martín, 2014. "Delaying the Normal and Early Retirement Ages in Spain: Behavioural and Welfare Consequences for Employed and Unemployed Workers," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(4), pages 341-375, December.
    2. Pilar García Gómez, 2008. "Institutions, health shocks and labour outcomes across Europe," Working Papers 2008-01, FEDEA.
    3. Eric Delattre & Richard Moussa, 2018. "Early retirement decisions: Lessons from a dynamic structural modelling," THEMA Working Papers 2018-04, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    4. Otto Lenhart, 2019. "The effects of health shocks on labor market outcomes: evidence from UK panel data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(1), pages 83-98, February.
    5. David M. Zimmer, 2015. "Employment Effects Of Health Shocks: The Role Of Fringe Benefits," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 346-358, October.
    6. Zucchelli, E. & Harris, M. & Zhao, X., 2012. "Ill-health and transitions to part-time work and self-employment among older workers," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    7. García-Gómez, Pilar & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2010. "Health effects on labour market exits and entries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 62-76, January.
    8. Paraponaris, Alain & Teyssier, Luis Sagaon & Ventelou, Bruno, 2010. "Job tenure and self-reported workplace discrimination for cancer survivors 2 years after diagnosis: Does employment legislation matter?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(2-3), pages 144-155, December.
    9. Raquel Vegas Sánchez & Isabel Argimón & Marta Botella & Clara González, 2013. "Old age pensions and retirement in Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 273-307, August.
    10. Pilar Garcia-Gomez & Hans van Kippersluis & Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2011. "Effects of Health on Own and Spousal Employment and Income using Acute Hospital Admissions," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-143/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Harris, M.N. & Zhao, X. & Zucchelli, E., 2016. "The dynamics of health and labour market transitions at older ages: evidence from a multi-state model," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/30, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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