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Job tenure and self-reported workplace discrimination for cancer survivors 2 years after diagnosis: Does employment legislation matter?

  • Paraponaris, Alain
  • Teyssier, Luis Sagaon
  • Ventelou, Bruno

Objectives To assess the risk of leaving employment for cancer survivors 2 years after diagnosis and the role of workplace discrimination in this risk.Methods A representative sample of 4270 French individuals older than 17 and younger than 58 years when diagnosed with cancer in 2002 were interviewed 2 years later. Their occupational status was analyzed with the help of Probit and IV-Probit models.Results Overall, 66% of the cancer survivors who were working at the time of diagnosis were still employed 2 years later. Age, education level, income at diagnosis, work contract, professional status, affective support, relative prognosis at diagnosis, tumor site and treatment have contrasting impacts upon the probability of job loss across gender. Even after having controlled for these variables, self-reported workplace discrimination increases the probability of job loss by 15%.Conclusions Despite protective labor law and favorable health insurance arrangements, French cancer survivors continue to experience problems to stay in or to return to the labor force. Measures targeting only the employment protection of cancer survivors do not seem to be sufficient to end prior social inequalities in job attainment. Intervention for specific populations particularly exposed to job-loss risks would also be needed.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

Volume (Year): 98 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (December)
Pages: 144-155

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Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:98:y:2010:i:2-3:p:144-155
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

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