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Breast Cancer Survival, Work, and Earnings

  • Cathy J. Bradley
  • Heather Bednarek
  • David Neumark

Relying on data from the Health and Retirement Study, we examine differences between breast cancer survivors and a non-cancer control group in employment, hours worked, wages, and earnings. Overall, breast cancer has a negative impact on the decision to work. However, among survivors who work, hours of work and, correspondingly, annual earnings are higher compared to women in the non-cancer control group. These findings suggest that while breast cancer has a negative effect on women's employment, breast cancer may not be debilitating for those who remain in the work force. We explore numerous possible biases underlying our estimates especially selection based on information in the Health and Retirement Study, and examine related evidence from supplemental data sources.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8134.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8134.

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Date of creation: Feb 2001
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Publication status: published as Bradley, Cathy J., Heather L. Bednarek and David Neumark. "Breast Cancer Survival, Work, And Earnings," Journal of Health Economics, 2002, v21(5,Sep), 757-779.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8134
Note: LS
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