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The Effects of Breast Cancer on Individual Labour Market Outcomes: An Evaluation from an Administrative Panel in France

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  • Thomas Barnay
  • Emmanuel Duguet
  • Christine Le Clainche

Abstract

We estimate the effect of breast cancer on labour market participation in France, up to five years after the cancer onset. The causal inference is systematically confounded by differences in age, wage at the beginning of career, past health and the past history in the labour market. We account for all these issues thanks to an administrative data set which follows individuals from their entry in the labour market. We find that the detrimental effect of the breast cancer for women increases significantly over time up to 10 percentage points after five years. We also find evidence that the effect of cancer is reduced for younger generations.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Barnay & Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2019. "The Effects of Breast Cancer on Individual Labour Market Outcomes: An Evaluation from an Administrative Panel in France," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 136, pages 103-126.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2019:i:136:p:103-126
    DOI: 10.15609/annaeconstat2009.136.0103
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Breast Cancer; Female Labour Market Participation; Difference in Differences; Matching; France.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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