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A sequential model for older workers’ labor transitions after a health shock

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  • Sergi Jiménez-Martín
  • José M. Labeaga
  • Cristina Vilaplana Prieto

Abstract

In this work we study older workers’ (50—64) labor force transitions after a health/disability shock. We find that the probability of keeping working decreases with both age and severity of the shock. Moreover, we find strong interactions between age and severity in the 50—64 age range and none in the 30–49 age range. Regarding demographics we find that being female and married reduce the probability of keeping work. On the contrary, being main breadwinner, education and skill levels increase it. Interestingly, the effect of some demographics changes its sign when we look at transitions from inactivity to work. This is the case of being married or having a working spouse. Undoubtedly, leisure complementarities should play a role in the latter case. Since the data we use contains a very detailed information on disabilities, we are able to evaluate the marginal effect of each type of disability either in the probability of keeping working or in returning back to work. Some of these results may have strong policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergi Jiménez-Martín & José M. Labeaga & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, "undated". "A sequential model for older workers’ labor transitions after a health shock," Working Papers 2005-23, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2005-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bound, John & Schoenbaum, Michael & Stinebrickner, Todd R. & Waidmann, Timothy, 1999. "The dynamic effects of health on the labor force transitions of older workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 179-202, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pilar García Gómez & Angel López Nicolás, 2006. "Health shocks, employment and income in the Spanish labour market," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 997-1009.
    2. Andrés J. Marchante Mera & Bienvenido Ortega Aguaza & José Sánchez Maldonado, 2006. "Las dimensiones del bienestar en las Comunidades Autónomas Españolas. Un análisis de Sigma y Gamma-Convergencia," Working Papers 2006-05, FEDEA.
    3. Sergi Jimenez-Martin & Judit Castello, 2013. "Business cycle and spillover effects on pre-retirement behavior in Spain," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-23, December.
    4. Pedro N. Rodríguez, & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2006. "Understanding and Forecasting Stock Price Changes," Working Papers 2006-03, FEDEA.
    5. Sergi Jiménez Martín & Judit Vall Castello, 2009. "Business Cycle Effects on Labour Force Transitions for Older People in Spain," Working Papers 2009-25, FEDEA.
    6. repec:wfo:wstudy:46672 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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